Job cuts warning over EU referendum

South east MEP Catherine Bearder

South east MEP Catherine Bearder

First published in News Bucks Free Press: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A EUROPEAN politician said jobs would be under threat if Britain left the EU - after the head of an Amersham-based firm called on the UK to remain in Europe.

Prime Minister David Cameron has said a referundum over Britain's future in Europe will be held if the Conservatives win the next General Election.

But south east MEP Catherine Bearder said pulling out of the EU would cost millions of people their jobs.

She made the warning after Ferdinando Beccalli-Falco, the chief executive of the GE Europe group - whose healthcare department employs over 1,000 at its Amersham - said: "It wouldn’t be good for England; it wouldn’t be good for Europe.

"I really hope that England is not going to leave the European Union."

Mrs Bearder said: "The investment and jobs that our membership of the European Union provides is the main reason why I believe so passionately that we should stay in the EU.

"Those that want to pull us out of Europe threaten millions of jobs across the country, including in Amersham.

"There is nothing patriotic about putting jobs at risk."

The Liberal Democrat member added: "GE Healthcare in Amersham is a real success story and we should be doing more to allow them to grow further by working on new trade deals and cutting more red tape. Both things I’m already proud of having done in my time in the European Parliament."

Comments (6)

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8:32pm Mon 24 Mar 14

England must be saved says...

What a load of cobblers !!
What a load of cobblers !! England must be saved
  • Score: 10

8:57am Tue 25 Mar 14

gpn01 says...

The only jkobs that would definitely be lost would be those of MEP's as they would no longer be needed. Meanwhile Europe would still continue to trade with UK.
The only jkobs that would definitely be lost would be those of MEP's as they would no longer be needed. Meanwhile Europe would still continue to trade with UK. gpn01
  • Score: 12

10:05am Tue 25 Mar 14

A VOTER says...

The original 1975 UK vote on Europe, was to join an EEC - A European Economic Community, which was to allow Free Trade. It was referred to as The Common Market. THAT'S ALL. The British people did not vote for what it has now become; Highly politicised, highly corrupt, wasteful, overly costly, and run by unelected bureaucrats.
If the UK just returns to the basic concept of a Free Trading Agreement with Europe, as originally intended, then the majority of UK citizens would be happy with that.
As it is now, the UK is not able to control immigration from Europe, nor are we able to evict criminals and terrorists. Our fishing rights have been reduced to the point where our fishing industry is in danger of collapse.
Europe is destroying economies instead of making them better. Look at Italy, Spain, and especially Greece. Unemployment there has grown to levels that have never been seen before.
The UK would be financially better off by £18 billion per year, just from the membership fee alone. That wasted £18 billion could benefit the UK in so many ways.
True, we may loose a comparatively few jobs by withdrawing, but more would be created in their place, as we would be able to trade unrestrained with the rest of the world. Europe would not stop trading with the UK.

The UK would be far better off, outside of the corrupt expensive quagmire that Europe has become.
The original 1975 UK vote on Europe, was to join an EEC - A European Economic Community, which was to allow Free Trade. It was referred to as The Common Market. THAT'S ALL. The British people did not vote for what it has now become; Highly politicised, highly corrupt, wasteful, overly costly, and run by unelected bureaucrats. If the UK just returns to the basic concept of a Free Trading Agreement with Europe, as originally intended, then the majority of UK citizens would be happy with that. As it is now, the UK is not able to control immigration from Europe, nor are we able to evict criminals and terrorists. Our fishing rights have been reduced to the point where our fishing industry is in danger of collapse. Europe is destroying economies instead of making them better. Look at Italy, Spain, and especially Greece. Unemployment there has grown to levels that have never been seen before. The UK would be financially better off by £18 billion per year, just from the membership fee alone. That wasted £18 billion could benefit the UK in so many ways. True, we may loose a comparatively few jobs by withdrawing, but more would be created in their place, as we would be able to trade unrestrained with the rest of the world. Europe would not stop trading with the UK. The UK would be far better off, outside of the corrupt expensive quagmire that Europe has become. A VOTER
  • Score: 12

10:46am Tue 25 Mar 14

MattHopkins1620 says...

Exactly who's job will be lost. Yours? Mine?

This is the usual foggy statement designed to create panic but without any specific details. Always suggesting that we can only lose and have nothing to gain. Same generalised claim that is used to support the giant train set - It will generate jobs in the north.......blah blah blah.

If we leave the EU and they refuse to do business with us then perhaps we should consider whether it is in our country's interest to continue buying BMWs, Mercedes, Renaults, Citroens etc. How many jobs will be lost on the continent?
Exactly who's job will be lost. Yours? Mine? This is the usual foggy statement designed to create panic but without any specific details. Always suggesting that we can only lose and have nothing to gain. Same generalised claim that is used to support the giant train set - It will generate jobs in the north.......blah blah blah. If we leave the EU and they refuse to do business with us then perhaps we should consider whether it is in our country's interest to continue buying BMWs, Mercedes, Renaults, Citroens etc. How many jobs will be lost on the continent? MattHopkins1620
  • Score: 8

12:19pm Tue 25 Mar 14

tigeran says...

"A EUROPEAN politician said jobs would be under threat if Britain left the EU"

Roughly translated this means; "PLEASE DONT TAKE MY HUGE EU PENSION AWAY!"
"A EUROPEAN politician said jobs would be under threat if Britain left the EU" Roughly translated this means; "PLEASE DONT TAKE MY HUGE EU PENSION AWAY!" tigeran
  • Score: 6

12:29pm Tue 25 Mar 14

A VOTER says...

The UK joined the EEC in 1973, and in 1975 voters were given a referendum on whether to stay in or not.
In 1973, the original 15 member states of the EEC (prior to the 2004 enlargement round) accounted for 38 per cent of world DGP. Today that figure is 24 per cent and in 2020 it will be 15 per cent.

In June 2012, the former British Commonwealth’s economy overtook the eurozone's. According to the IMF, the countries within the single Euro currency zone will grow at an average of 2.7 per cent over the next five years – which strikes me as optimistic – while the Commonwealth surges ahead at 7.3 per cent. The EU has also been comprehensively outperformed by the United States over this period.

British trade has been redirected, by government intervention, away from the markets to which we are connected by language and law, habit and sentiment; markets which, unlike those in the EU, are growing.

The Swiss declined to join the EU, instead negotiating a series of sectorial trade agreements covering everything from fish farming to the permitted size of lorries. As a result, they are fully able to trade with Europe, free to determine their own human rights issues, and spared the massive budget contributions which EU members are required to make to Brussels.

Switzerland has not suffered as a result of not being part of the EU: In 2011, their exports to the EU were, in per capita terms, 450 per cent of Britain’s. This means that Switzerland sells four-and-a-half times as much per head to the EU from outside as the UK does from inside. More critically, they don’t allow the EU to dictate their trading arrangements with non EU countries.

It makes logical and financial perfect sense for the UK to leave the EU, and fully control our own destiny.
The UK joined the EEC in 1973, and in 1975 voters were given a referendum on whether to stay in or not. In 1973, the original 15 member states of the EEC (prior to the 2004 enlargement round) accounted for 38 per cent of world DGP. Today that figure is 24 per cent and in 2020 it will be 15 per cent. In June 2012, the former British Commonwealth’s economy overtook the eurozone's. According to the IMF, the countries within the single Euro currency zone will grow at an average of 2.7 per cent over the next five years – which strikes me as optimistic – while the Commonwealth surges ahead at 7.3 per cent. The EU has also been comprehensively outperformed by the United States over this period. British trade has been redirected, by government intervention, away from the markets to which we are connected by language and law, habit and sentiment; markets which, unlike those in the EU, are growing. The Swiss declined to join the EU, instead negotiating a series of sectorial trade agreements covering everything from fish farming to the permitted size of lorries. As a result, they are fully able to trade with Europe, free to determine their own human rights issues, and spared the massive budget contributions which EU members are required to make to Brussels. Switzerland has not suffered as a result of not being part of the EU: In 2011, their exports to the EU were, in per capita terms, 450 per cent of Britain’s. This means that Switzerland sells four-and-a-half times as much per head to the EU from outside as the UK does from inside. More critically, they don’t allow the EU to dictate their trading arrangements with non EU countries. It makes logical and financial perfect sense for the UK to leave the EU, and fully control our own destiny. A VOTER
  • Score: 6

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