Royal Grammar School reveals its next headteacher

Bucks Free Press: Incoming: Philip Wayne Incoming: Philip Wayne

THE Royal Grammar School has revealed the man who will succeed Roy Page as headteacher next year.

Philip Wayne will leave his current post as headmaster of Chesham Grammar School to join the RGS on September 1, 2015.

The RGS board of governors said Mr Wayne was the ‘unanimous choice’ to take over from the retiring Mr Page following a lengthy selection process to find a worthy replacement.

Mr Wayne said: “By September 2015, I shall have completed eight years at Chesham Grammar, a school which I am incredibly proud to have led.

“It will be a great honour to succeed Roy Page who has led RGS with such distinction.

“Coming to RGS will give me a new challenge and I look forward to building on its traditions to establish a school that delivers a truly outstanding 21st century education.”

Mr Wayne, who lives close to High Wycombe with his wife and two 10-year-old twins, is chair of the Buckinghamshire Grammar Schools group and an ex-deputy head of John Hampden Grammar School.

Steve Ashton, RGS chair of governors, said: “We are all delighted to have secured such an able successor to Roy as Phil Wayne.

“Phil has a proven track record in continuous improvement and shares the governing body’s ambition to build on Roy’s work and take RGS to the next level, in terms of both academic results but also the wider education opportunities available to boys.

“For his part, I know Roy Page is determined to continue with RGS’s development plans and hand over a top performing school.

“The governing body will be supporting that aspiration in full.”

Mr Wayne will continue to lead Chesham Grammar School, which was ranked outstanding by Ofsted in March, and help find his successor over the next year.

He will also visit RGS to ensure a smooth transition from Mr Page, who is retiring after 43 years service at the Amersham Road-based school.

Mr Page is a National Leader of Education and will have been the RGS headteacher for nine years by the time he retires next summer.

Comments (5)

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6:36pm Mon 7 Jul 14

Marlow Mum says...

I'm glad that the BFP has clarified that he lives with his two twins. I would have struggled to work that one out ;0)
I'm glad that the BFP has clarified that he lives with his two twins. I would have struggled to work that one out ;0) Marlow Mum
  • Score: 13

9:48am Tue 8 Jul 14

mistamina says...

Nice jobs, if you can get it.
Nice jobs, if you can get it. mistamina
  • Score: 1

8:07pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Lividov says...

Congratulations.
Congratulations. Lividov
  • Score: 0

2:09pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

This man looks extremely similar to the ‘Philip Wayne’ referred to in a report in the BFP last October – this Philip Wayne had said:
We were pleased overall with the secondary transfer test both in terms of the process and its content. It was an excellent partnership between grammar schools, primary schools and the county council admissions service. Data is being analysed, but early feedback from our primary headteacher colleagues is that the test was appropriate for the purpose for which it was designed,
(see http://www.bucksfree
press.co.uk/news/107
51891.New_11__hailed
_a_success_by_gramma
r_schools/
This March the same man was referred to in another BFP report: .
(http://www.bucksfre
epress.co.uk/news/11
075831.Confusion_ove
r_national_newspaper
_s_11__report/)
The ‘Philip Wayne’ referred to there had inadvertently given a misleading report to the Observer, which, had quoted it as if it were an established fact.

The BFP reported Mr Wayne’s retraction as being associated with ‘confusion’ at the Observer (not the BFP though, which had followed exactly the same line) after the Observer.
Stephen Pritchard the Guardian/Observer Readers' Editor – apologised for giving a lopsided report last autumn of the new ‘finally perfected’ 11+ exam in this county and basically withdrew its original report the previous autumn - see
http://www.theguardi
an.com/theobserver/2
014/mar/08/readers-e
ditor-on-reporting-b
oth-sides-argument
The Observer report the previous autumn had said:
Provisional results indicate that a more diverse selection of pupils passed this test, and headteachers say they feel the change has made a difference.
Stephen Pritchard apologised for the fact that:
... only two headteachers were quoted. One was Philip Wayne, chairman of the Bucks Grammar Schools Association, who said he was "very confident" that the new test would make a difference, which was understandable as his association had implemented it, and the other a primary school head, (Ms Ros Rochefort, headteacher at Bledlow Ridge primary school) introduced to the paper by Mr Wayne, who claimed the test was a success for her pupils.
Mr Pritchard went on in his apology to explain that:
Officially, no exam statistics are available until September, after an appeals process has been completed. Bucks county council told me that the county's grammar schools are now centrally-funded academies and are their own admissions authorities; technically, the schools own the data and the council can't release them yet.
Editor Pritchard was contrite about the shortcomings of the Observer’s original report:
… some simple digging would have revealed that opposition groups in the county had winkled out provisional figures from the council that suggest a different story on admissions. At Christmas … a member of Wycombe Labour party, asked the council some straight questions about the total number of pupils from state schools who had passed the test and those from private and out-of-county schools who had been successful.
Extrapolated, the figures he received purport to show that between 2013 and 2014 the proportion of Bucks grammar school places going to children from local state primary schools decreased from 44% to 38%. Despite the number of applicants from state primaries increasing by nearly 300 for this year, 110 fewer children from these schools won a grammar school place.
The figures also showed the proportion of places won by pupils from Bucks private schools dropped from 21% to 15% – but then 292 fewer children from these schools entered the exam. The number of places going to out-of-county children, however, rose by 336 to 1,174, giving these pupils 47% of the available grammar school places.
It would not have been difficult for the Observer to find people who question why Buckinghamshire taxpayers support grammar schools in Bucks when apparently, though this currently cannot be confirmed, more than 60% of places go to pupils from private schools or schools from outside the county.


Mr Wayne was quoted later in the Guardian/Observer’
s retraction by Mr Pritchard and this time Mr Wayne was dogged but even more abstract and cagey:
Mr Wayne would not be drawn on these extrapolations. "I believe that the figures quoted to you (i.e. those obtained by a member of Wycombe Labour party) and the interpretation placed upon them are inaccurate" he said. "I cannot, therefore, make an informed comment until the process is complete.

At the time I asked an obvious question: ‘If Mr Wayne cannot make an informed comment now then why was he able to comment so firmly in the BFP report (and the Observer’s) last October?’

I am wondering now if Mr Wayne will be able to a ‘more informed comment’ when the process is complete in September.
This man looks extremely similar to the ‘Philip Wayne’ referred to in a report in the BFP last October – this Philip Wayne had said: [italic]We were pleased overall with the secondary transfer test both in terms of the process and its content. It was an excellent partnership between grammar schools, primary schools and the county council admissions service. Data is being analysed, but early feedback from our primary headteacher colleagues is that the test was appropriate for the purpose for which it was designed, [/italic] (see http://www.bucksfree press.co.uk/news/107 51891.New_11__hailed _a_success_by_gramma r_schools/ This March the same man was referred to in another BFP report: . (http://www.bucksfre epress.co.uk/news/11 075831.Confusion_ove r_national_newspaper _s_11__report/) The ‘Philip Wayne’ referred to there had inadvertently given a misleading report to the Observer, which, had quoted it as if it were an established fact. The BFP reported Mr Wayne’s retraction as being associated with ‘confusion’ at the Observer (not the BFP though, which had followed exactly the same line) after the Observer. Stephen Pritchard the Guardian/Observer Readers' Editor – apologised for giving a lopsided report last autumn of the new ‘finally perfected’ 11+ exam in this county and basically withdrew its original report the previous autumn - see http://www.theguardi an.com/theobserver/2 014/mar/08/readers-e ditor-on-reporting-b oth-sides-argument The Observer report the previous autumn had said: [italic]Provisional results indicate that a more diverse selection of pupils passed this test, and headteachers say they feel the change has made a difference. [/italic] Stephen Pritchard apologised for the fact that: [italic]... only two headteachers were quoted. One was Philip Wayne, chairman of the Bucks Grammar Schools Association, who said he was "very confident" that the new test would make a difference, which was understandable as his association had implemented it, and the other a primary school head, (Ms Ros Rochefort, headteacher at Bledlow Ridge primary school) introduced to the paper by Mr Wayne, who claimed the test was a success for her pupils. [/italic] Mr Pritchard went on in his apology to explain that: [italic]Officially, no exam statistics are available until September, after an appeals process has been completed. Bucks county council told me that the county's grammar schools are now centrally-funded academies and are their own admissions authorities; technically, the schools own the data and the council can't release them yet. [/italic] Editor Pritchard was contrite about the shortcomings of the Observer’s original report: [italic]… some simple digging would have revealed that opposition groups in the county had winkled out provisional figures from the council that suggest a different story on admissions. At Christmas … a member of Wycombe Labour party, asked the council some straight questions about the total number of pupils from state schools who had passed the test and those from private and out-of-county schools who had been successful. Extrapolated, the figures he received purport to show that between 2013 and 2014 the proportion of Bucks grammar school places going to children from local state primary schools decreased from 44% to 38%. Despite the number of applicants from state primaries increasing by nearly 300 for this year, 110 fewer children from these schools won a grammar school place. The figures also showed the proportion of places won by pupils from Bucks private schools dropped from 21% to 15% – but then 292 fewer children from these schools entered the exam. The number of places going to out-of-county children, however, rose by 336 to 1,174, giving these pupils 47% of the available grammar school places. It would not have been difficult for the Observer to find people who question why Buckinghamshire taxpayers support grammar schools in Bucks when apparently, though this currently cannot be confirmed, more than 60% of places go to pupils from private schools or schools from outside the county. [/italic] Mr Wayne was quoted later in the Guardian/Observer’ s retraction by Mr Pritchard and this time Mr Wayne was dogged but even more abstract and cagey: [italic]Mr Wayne would not be drawn on these extrapolations. "I believe that the figures quoted to you (i.e. those obtained by a member of Wycombe Labour party) and the interpretation placed upon them are inaccurate" he said. "I cannot, therefore, make an informed comment until the process is complete. [/italic] At the time I asked an obvious question: ‘If Mr Wayne cannot make an informed comment now then why was he able to comment so firmly in the BFP report (and the Observer’s) last October?’ I am wondering now if Mr Wayne will be able to a ‘more informed comment’ when the process is complete in September. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 2

3:29pm Thu 24 Jul 14

mistamina says...

How can he be confused? This association is the top body; top heads, top teachers, we give them financing, and out top 20% best, richest (on the main) children and 20% best, richest (on the main) parents.
They must have the results, it is their exams.
How can he be confused? This association is the top body; top heads, top teachers, we give them financing, and out top 20% best, richest (on the main) children and 20% best, richest (on the main) parents. They must have the results, it is their exams. mistamina
  • Score: 1
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