Ambulance service advice for icy driving conditions

Bucks Free Press: Ambucalnce service advice for icy driving conditions Ambucalnce service advice for icy driving conditions

WITH snow and ice forecast over the next few days South Central Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust is issuing advice to motorists in Bucks on driving in snow and icy conditions.

Read it’s guide below:

Avoid driving in these conditions unless your journey is absolutely necessary.

Ensure you have sufficient fuel for your journey and that you have a mobile phone, ice-scraper, de-icer, blanket, shovel, jump leads, warning triangle, hi-viz jacket or vest, hot flask and food in the event of getting trapped.

Stopping distances can be up to ten times longer in ice and snow.

Gentle manoeuvres are the key to safe driving in heavy snow.

Use all the car's controls - accelerator, brakes, clutch and steering - as gently and progressively as possible.

Modern diesel vehicles will pull away on ‘tick-over’ with accurate and concise use of the clutch, without any use of the accelerator.

This will help to get you moving and will allow maximum grip when doing so. Dependant on the situation and conditions ahead of you, you can select second gear when pulling away, easing your foot off the clutch gently to avoid wheel-spin.

Once moving try to maintain a constant speed, choosing the most suitable gear in advance to avoid having to change down while climbing or descending hills and gradients.

Ensure your boots or shoes are cleaned or snow and ice underneath to ensure your safety getting in and out of the vehicle and also to ensure they do not slip on the pedals whilst driving.

If you do get stuck, straighten the steering and clear the snow from the wheels. Put a sack or old rug in front of the driving wheels to give the tyres some grip. Once on the move again, try not to stop until you reach firmer ground.

Clear snow from the roof as well as from windows.

Snow piled up on the roof can fall onto the windscreen obscuring your view and can also be a hazard to other road users. You could be fined up to £2,500 and receive three penalty points if the police consider your car a danger to other road users, or are unable to maintain a clear and unobstructed view of your surroundings.

Keep to main roads as they are more likely to be gritted and will be patrolled by police and Highways Authorities.

If you breakdown or get stuck stay with your vehicle unless you know exactly where you are and are capable of getting to a known place of safety.

Never let other speeding drivers lull you into a false sense of security.

Only drive as fast as conditions, your vehicle and your abilities allow.

If you don’t have to go, stay at home.

Before you set off it's worth taking a few minutes to make sure that there aren't any problems on your intended route.

 

Check the weather at metoffice.gov.uk

Call the Highways Agency information line on 0300 123 5000

Tune into DAB Traffic Radio

Visit www.highways.gov.uk/traffic.aspx

Comments (8)

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1:39pm Fri 11 Jan 13

miccles says...

Well as BCC has plenty of salt around, and they are all geared up for this icy weather, i don't think we will notice anything icy about the roads, isn't that true Mr Tett???
Well as BCC has plenty of salt around, and they are all geared up for this icy weather, i don't think we will notice anything icy about the roads, isn't that true Mr Tett??? miccles

1:57pm Fri 11 Jan 13

Ivor'sbestfriend says...

Why is the Ambulance Service advising motorists on how to drive? Don't they have more important things to do?

I'm sure it's the AA's job to tell people how to drive on snow.
Why is the Ambulance Service advising motorists on how to drive? Don't they have more important things to do? I'm sure it's the AA's job to tell people how to drive on snow. Ivor'sbestfriend

3:49pm Fri 11 Jan 13

realist_highwycombe says...

I would assume it is because like the police and fire service they get fed up of having to risk their lives going out to collisions caused by silly people who think it's a great idea to drive down The Pastures when it's covered in snow or drive 40mph down West Wycombe Road because there are no other cars around etc.
I would assume it is because like the police and fire service they get fed up of having to risk their lives going out to collisions caused by silly people who think it's a great idea to drive down The Pastures when it's covered in snow or drive 40mph down West Wycombe Road because there are no other cars around etc. realist_highwycombe

3:58pm Fri 11 Jan 13

Ivor'sbestfriend says...

realist_highwycombe wrote:
I would assume it is because like the police and fire service they get fed up of having to risk their lives going out to collisions caused by silly people who think it's a great idea to drive down The Pastures when it's covered in snow or drive 40mph down West Wycombe Road because there are no other cars around etc.
Perhaps.

In that case they should sack one of their overpaid management types and buy themselves one of these:

http://www.mod-sales
.com/direct/vehicle/
,37,/46101/Tempest_4
x4.htm

They'd never have to worry about other cars getting in the way again.
[quote][p][bold]realist_highwycombe[/bold] wrote: I would assume it is because like the police and fire service they get fed up of having to risk their lives going out to collisions caused by silly people who think it's a great idea to drive down The Pastures when it's covered in snow or drive 40mph down West Wycombe Road because there are no other cars around etc.[/p][/quote]Perhaps. In that case they should sack one of their overpaid management types and buy themselves one of these: http://www.mod-sales .com/direct/vehicle/ ,37,/46101/Tempest_4 x4.htm They'd never have to worry about other cars getting in the way again. Ivor'sbestfriend

4:35pm Fri 11 Jan 13

Voyeur says...

One tip I can share is to plan your route to use gritted roads only where possible and avoid steep hills and hilly routes if at all possible. It might make for a longer journey but it will be safer.
One tip I can share is to plan your route to use gritted roads only where possible and avoid steep hills and hilly routes if at all possible. It might make for a longer journey but it will be safer. Voyeur

5:43pm Fri 11 Jan 13

BOOKERite says...

Voyeur wrote:
One tip I can share is to plan your route to use gritted roads only where possible and avoid steep hills and hilly routes if at all possible. It might make for a longer journey but it will be safer.
I think it would be very difficult to avoid hilly routes in Wycombe!
[quote][p][bold]Voyeur[/bold] wrote: One tip I can share is to plan your route to use gritted roads only where possible and avoid steep hills and hilly routes if at all possible. It might make for a longer journey but it will be safer.[/p][/quote]I think it would be very difficult to avoid hilly routes in Wycombe! BOOKERite

8:04pm Fri 11 Jan 13

Voyeur says...

@BOOKERite - as I said "where possible". It is possible to use roads on the valley floors rather than the hilly roads especially if they are gritted. I once had to get from High Wycombe to Wendover and instead of going over the hills, I went to Beaconsfield, Amersham and thence to Wendover all on gritted roads and with little or no hills.
@BOOKERite - as I said "where possible". It is possible to use roads on the valley floors rather than the hilly roads especially if they are gritted. I once had to get from High Wycombe to Wendover and instead of going over the hills, I went to Beaconsfield, Amersham and thence to Wendover all on gritted roads and with little or no hills. Voyeur

7:24pm Sat 12 Jan 13

Contax says...

I agree with the policy don't drive unless you really have to in icy and snowy weather unless you are lucky enough to live on a route where the roads are treated. Where I live our street has a hill which goes round a bend but to make it worse it's a narrow road and people with drives park their cars on the road side on the bend, cars going down hill are the ones that have to give way which means they could end up skidding into the parked cars, although a retired HGV driver I still try to avoid the risk, I value my insurance record.
I agree with the policy don't drive unless you really have to in icy and snowy weather unless you are lucky enough to live on a route where the roads are treated. Where I live our street has a hill which goes round a bend but to make it worse it's a narrow road and people with drives park their cars on the road side on the bend, cars going down hill are the ones that have to give way which means they could end up skidding into the parked cars, although a retired HGV driver I still try to avoid the risk, I value my insurance record. Contax

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