Ten things you may not know about Wycombe

Bucks Free Press: Ten things you may not know about Wycombe Ten things you may not know about Wycombe

HOW much do you know about High Wycombe?

If it is just that the town was once big on furniture and used to be the home of nineteenth century prime minister Benjamin Disraeli, then read on.

Here are a selection of ten facts, about the town – it’s history, sporting record and connection to famous names – that may have previously passed you by.

  • The Romans built a Villa on the Rye, where the swimming pool is now.

In about AD 150 the Romans came to this valley and built a villa on the Rye. This was first discovered in 1724 when workmen uncovered a mosaic pavement, and subsequent digs revealed a large villa with a complex bathhouse. It stood close to the Holy Well spring whose waters may have supplied the baths and it is thought that the villa was the centre of a large estate with several outlying farms. Roman bricks from the villa can still be seen in the tower of the church and in the ruins of St John’s Hospital in Easton Street.

  • In the early 18th century there were at least 26 mills on the river Wye between West Wycombe and Bourne End, where the river flows into the Thames.

The all-important river was vital to power the mills that grew up along the valley in the 11th century. There are twenty corn mills mentioned in the Doomsday Book along the nine miles between West Wycombe and the Thames. In medieval times some of the corn mills were adapted to the cloth trade. These were called fulling mills and their function was to beat newly woven cloth, under hammers driven by water power, to thicken and shrink it. This trade had largely died out by 1600.

Following on from the fulling mills came the paper mills. We know that Hedge Mill in Loudwater was operating in 1627 and the industry flourished in Wycombe until the end of the 20th century.

  • In 1830 workers in the paper-making mills went on a riot, smashing up the machines. Many of the rioters were transported to Tasmania, then called Van Diemen’s Land, making a substantial contribution to the development of that part of Australia.

In 1830 some of the paper manufacturers introduced mechanisation to speed up the process. This would have meant job losses and the paper workers were not happy about it. They grouped together and rampaged through the town destroying as many of the machines as possible. Most of them were caught and brought to trial. Many were then transported to Tasmania.

  • The first Royal Military College was founded in the High Street, in what was the Antelope Inn.

In 1799 Lieutenant Colonel Gaspard Le Marchant opened a school for army officers in the High Street. This establishment, known as the Royal Military College, tutored the students in a wide range of skills including trigonometry, geometry and French as well as siege warfare. They were not happy about the accommodation in the ancient Antelope Inn, built in 1480, but the school remained there for the next fourteen years before moving to Farnham in Surrey.

  • Wycombe Wanderers is the only lower league football club to have reached the semi-finals of both the League Cup and FA Cup when in the lower two Leagues.

 

  • In the 1950s there were four cinemas in the town centre of High Wycombe – The Palace, Rex, Odeon and Grand.

 

  • The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.

 

  • During WWII, when many goods were rationed, you could take your sugar ration into Taylors in Easton Street to be turned into sweets.

 

  • Among the famous pupils of the town's grammar schools have been stars of music, comedy, sport, cooking and literature.

Ian Dury, founder member of The Blockheads, attended the Royal Grammar School in the 1960s, while comedy star Jimmy Carr was there alongside rugby player and Question of Sport team captain Matt Dawson. Lauded poet TS Eliot taught at the school in the early 20th century, while we're on the subject.

Not to be outdone, John Hampden Grammar School boasts inventive chef Heston Blumenthal and legendary fantasy author Terry Pratchett (who would later work as a reporter for the BFP) among its roster.

 

  • The town has a history of marking special occasions by building archways made of chairs, to honour its furniture-making heritage.

The first of these was constructed in 1877 to mark a visit from Queen Victoria to Disraeli at his Hughenden Manor home. Another – the biggest, with about 400 chairs – ws built a few years later in 1884 to mark the visit of the Prince of Wales.

In 1889 The return of Sir Edwin Dashwood from New Zealand was celebrated by an arch of chairs outside The George and Dragon in West Wycombe.

The next major chair arch came almost 80 years later, using more modern chairs, to mark a visit to the town by the Queen in 1962.
Then the last one so far was built in 2000 to commemorate the new millennium.
In the 1950s there were four cinemas in the town centre of High Wycombe – The Palace, Rex, Odeon and Grand.

Comments (79)

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7:20am Tue 28 Jan 14

swearmeister says...

Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm swearmeister
  • Score: -18

10:06am Tue 28 Jan 14

I Love Ivor says...

swearmeister wrote:
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.
[quote][p][bold]swearmeister[/bold] wrote: Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm[/p][/quote]Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street. I Love Ivor
  • Score: -40

10:11am Tue 28 Jan 14

miccles says...

I Love Ivor wrote:
swearmeister wrote:
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.
Before it moved into the high street, it was where the entrance to the Chilterns is now, next to Primark.
[quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swearmeister[/bold] wrote: Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm[/p][/quote]Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.[/p][/quote]Before it moved into the high street, it was where the entrance to the Chilterns is now, next to Primark. miccles
  • Score: 28

11:06am Tue 28 Jan 14

Edgar Brooks says...

I Love Ivor wrote:
swearmeister wrote:
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.
Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.
[quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swearmeister[/bold] wrote: Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm[/p][/quote]Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.[/p][/quote]Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store. Edgar Brooks
  • Score: 29

11:19am Tue 28 Jan 14

NonProphet says...

On the subject of Sir Terry Pratchett. Wasn't High Wycombe and environs his patch when he was a reporter?
Why is nothing named in his honour? If any where else in the world has such a connection they'd be maximising the opportunity to celebrate and bring much needed revenue into the town.

There are laces in America where someone vaguely famous only had to wave as they passed by in train and they'd rename the High Street 'Mark Twain Waved At Us' Road and build a museum, visitor centre (center) and The MArk Twain Waved At Us Experience.

It seems we really are missing a trick - especially you BFP he was one of yours!

Some suggestions

The Library - Pratchett has a huge fondness for libraries (ook!) - so maybe rename the central library The Sir Terry Pratchett Just Come In And Learn Some Stuff For Free For Goodness Sake Library

Frogmoor - I once read an interview where Sir Terry mentioned that he bought his very first sci-fi books from a little books shop in Frogmoor, Again if this were any where else there would at the very least be a plaque. Heaven's knows the area needs some regen - we could start by renaming it The Terry Pratchett Not Technically A Square Square.

We should be aiming to attract the legion of fans who hold huge DiscWorld Conventions all over the planet to use High Wycombe and its facilities as a central hub for their activities.

We could have a Pratchett Day - again Bloomsday in Dublin and around the world is a now a multi million dollar industry.

The possibilities are legion.

You know what? to quote Terry himself

You often hear people say 'someone should do something about this' but you rarely hear it followed by the words 'and that person is me.'

So you know what I'm going to do something. BFP - get a journalist to contact me and we can get something going - at the very least it will make some stories.
On the subject of Sir Terry Pratchett. Wasn't High Wycombe and environs his patch when he was a reporter? Why is nothing named in his honour? If any where else in the world has such a connection they'd be maximising the opportunity to celebrate and bring much needed revenue into the town. There are laces in America where someone vaguely famous only had to wave as they passed by in train and they'd rename the High Street 'Mark Twain Waved At Us' Road and build a museum, visitor centre (center) and The MArk Twain Waved At Us Experience. It seems we really are missing a trick - especially you BFP he was one of yours! Some suggestions The Library - Pratchett has a huge fondness for libraries (ook!) - so maybe rename the central library The Sir Terry Pratchett Just Come In And Learn Some Stuff For Free For Goodness Sake Library Frogmoor - I once read an interview where Sir Terry mentioned that he bought his very first sci-fi books from a little books shop in Frogmoor, Again if this were any where else there would at the very least be a plaque. Heaven's knows the area needs some regen - we could start by renaming it The Terry Pratchett Not Technically A Square Square. We should be aiming to attract the legion of fans who hold huge DiscWorld Conventions all over the planet to use High Wycombe and its facilities as a central hub for their activities. We could have a Pratchett Day - again Bloomsday in Dublin and around the world is a now a multi million dollar industry. The possibilities are legion. You know what? to quote Terry himself You often hear people say 'someone should do something about this' but you rarely hear it followed by the words 'and that person is me.' So you know what I'm going to do something. BFP - get a journalist to contact me and we can get something going - at the very least it will make some stories. NonProphet
  • Score: -23

11:21am Tue 28 Jan 14

miccles says...

chepping100 wrote:
More things the Bucks Free Press did not know about Wycombe.

"The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.".

Not true,
as well as Woolworths, the Chilterns shopping centre included The Palace cinema, a branch of Barclays Bank, The Red Cow pub and Lipton’s supermarket on Frogmoor and Hepworth’s taylors on Church St.

Yet more lazy ‘journalism’ from the Bucks Free Press.
Wasn't the Red Cow pub further up the road near the railway bridge?
and Tesco's was there too, and over the road was the bus station.
[quote][p][bold]chepping100[/bold] wrote: More things the Bucks Free Press did not know about Wycombe. "The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.". Not true, as well as Woolworths, the Chilterns shopping centre included The Palace cinema, a branch of Barclays Bank, The Red Cow pub and Lipton’s supermarket on Frogmoor and Hepworth’s taylors on Church St. Yet more lazy ‘journalism’ from the Bucks Free Press.[/p][/quote]Wasn't the Red Cow pub further up the road near the railway bridge? and Tesco's was there too, and over the road was the bus station. miccles
  • Score: 19

11:24am Tue 28 Jan 14

I Love Ivor says...

Edgar Brooks wrote:
I Love Ivor wrote:
swearmeister wrote:
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.
Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.
Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply.

Having checked on the internet there Is also 'as far as I can see' no mention of Woolworths being where the Chilterns currently is. Even a lot of the Historical sites by people who are obviously far older than I am do not mention this fact!
[quote][p][bold]Edgar Brooks[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swearmeister[/bold] wrote: Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm[/p][/quote]Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.[/p][/quote]Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.[/p][/quote]Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply. Having checked on the internet there Is also 'as far as I can see' no mention of Woolworths being where the Chilterns currently is. Even a lot of the Historical sites by people who are obviously far older than I am do not mention this fact! I Love Ivor
  • Score: -29

11:51am Tue 28 Jan 14

miccles says...

I Love Ivor wrote:
Edgar Brooks wrote:
I Love Ivor wrote:
swearmeister wrote:
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.
Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.
Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply.

Having checked on the internet there Is also 'as far as I can see' no mention of Woolworths being where the Chilterns currently is. Even a lot of the Historical sites by people who are obviously far older than I am do not mention this fact!
Well it was there, because I can remember walking through it, and I will always remember the wooden creaky floors it had.
[quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Edgar Brooks[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swearmeister[/bold] wrote: Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm[/p][/quote]Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.[/p][/quote]Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.[/p][/quote]Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply. Having checked on the internet there Is also 'as far as I can see' no mention of Woolworths being where the Chilterns currently is. Even a lot of the Historical sites by people who are obviously far older than I am do not mention this fact![/p][/quote]Well it was there, because I can remember walking through it, and I will always remember the wooden creaky floors it had. miccles
  • Score: 31

11:58am Tue 28 Jan 14

motco says...

The Woolworth's was vee shaped with two entrances and it came to a point at the back.
The Woolworth's was vee shaped with two entrances and it came to a point at the back. motco
  • Score: 22

12:06pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Mr.Imy says...

Wycombe vs Liverpool in the FA Cup semi-final in 2001 at Villa Park, those were the days.......must have been around 20,000 chairboys fans in Birmingham that day if not more!!
Wycombe vs Liverpool in the FA Cup semi-final in 2001 at Villa Park, those were the days.......must have been around 20,000 chairboys fans in Birmingham that day if not more!! Mr.Imy
  • Score: 6

12:37pm Tue 28 Jan 14

chepping100 says...

miccles wrote:
chepping100 wrote:
More things the Bucks Free Press did not know about Wycombe.

"The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.".

Not true,
as well as Woolworths, the Chilterns shopping centre included The Palace cinema, a branch of Barclays Bank, The Red Cow pub and Lipton’s supermarket on Frogmoor and Hepworth’s taylors on Church St.

Yet more lazy ‘journalism’ from the Bucks Free Press.
Wasn't the Red Cow pub further up the road near the railway bridge?
and Tesco's was there too, and over the road was the bus station.
Here's a phot of the Red Cow and Tesco:

https://www.facebook
.com/photo.php?fbid=
375714295869621&set=
a.372222876218763.85
656.372180262889691&
type=1&theater
[quote][p][bold]miccles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chepping100[/bold] wrote: More things the Bucks Free Press did not know about Wycombe. "The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.". Not true, as well as Woolworths, the Chilterns shopping centre included The Palace cinema, a branch of Barclays Bank, The Red Cow pub and Lipton’s supermarket on Frogmoor and Hepworth’s taylors on Church St. Yet more lazy ‘journalism’ from the Bucks Free Press.[/p][/quote]Wasn't the Red Cow pub further up the road near the railway bridge? and Tesco's was there too, and over the road was the bus station.[/p][/quote]Here's a phot of the Red Cow and Tesco: https://www.facebook .com/photo.php?fbid= 375714295869621&set= a.372222876218763.85 656.372180262889691& type=1&theater chepping100
  • Score: 3

1:46pm Tue 28 Jan 14

jwheeler1 says...

I am 52 and have lived around Wycombe all my life. I can remember woolworths where the Chiterns Centre is now, they used to use air tubes to send money to the cashiers office. The Palace cinema used to be around where the entrance to the Chilterns Centre in Frogmoor is. I used to love Murrays department store and visiting the market next door to what is now BHS which used to be open air - BHS used to be Sainsburys. Happy Days!
I am 52 and have lived around Wycombe all my life. I can remember woolworths where the Chiterns Centre is now, they used to use air tubes to send money to the cashiers office. The Palace cinema used to be around where the entrance to the Chilterns Centre in Frogmoor is. I used to love Murrays department store and visiting the market next door to what is now BHS which used to be open air - BHS used to be Sainsburys. Happy Days! jwheeler1
  • Score: 27

4:00pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Totteridge Gent says...

When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...
When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk... Totteridge Gent
  • Score: -25

4:56pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Totteridge Gent wrote:
When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...
Not the only things carelessly done here -

Ian Dury, founder member of The Blockheads, attended the Royal Grammar School in the 1960s …

Dury left the school in 1958, aged 16. At the time of his death it was mentioned several times that Dury referred to the Royal Grammar School in scathing terms till the day he died, for its snobbery and the unpleasant experiences he had there.

What a pity Dury and these other minor celebs did not go to a comprehensive in Wycombe - there would have been more of them then.


In the 1950s there were four cinemas in the town centre of High Wycombe – The Palace, Rex, Odeon and Grand.

You said that twice.

I have been unable to find references to Sir Edwin Dashwood in the files of the Times for that period in connection with New Zealand.
[quote][p][bold]Totteridge Gent[/bold] wrote: When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...[/p][/quote]Not the only things carelessly done here - [italic] Ian Dury, founder member of The Blockheads, attended the Royal Grammar School in the 1960s … [/italic] Dury left the school in 1958, aged 16. At the time of his death it was mentioned several times that Dury referred to the Royal Grammar School in scathing terms till the day he died, for its snobbery and the unpleasant experiences he had there. What a pity Dury and these other minor celebs did not go to a comprehensive in Wycombe - there would have been more of them then. [italic] In the 1950s there were four cinemas in the town centre of High Wycombe – The Palace, Rex, Odeon and Grand. [/italic] You said that twice. I have been unable to find references to Sir Edwin Dashwood in the files of the Times for that period in connection with New Zealand. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 14

4:57pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

All the other stuff is well-known to people interested in local history.
All the other stuff is well-known to people interested in local history. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 16

5:00pm Tue 28 Jan 14

NonProphet says...

Righ you lot, as per my above post I've started putting my shekels where my cake hole is.

So here is the link to the petition to get the High Wycombe Library renamed in honour of local boy and seller of 8,000,000 books Sir Terry Pratchett.

http://www.ipetition
s.com/petition/chang
e-the-name-of-high-w
ycombe-library-to-th
e

Lets see if we can get the man some deserved kudos from his home town.
Righ you lot, as per my above post I've started putting my shekels where my cake hole is. So here is the link to the petition to get the High Wycombe Library renamed in honour of local boy and seller of 8,000,000 books Sir Terry Pratchett. http://www.ipetition s.com/petition/chang e-the-name-of-high-w ycombe-library-to-th e Lets see if we can get the man some deserved kudos from his home town. NonProphet
  • Score: -20

5:01pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Trade directories in the 20th century suggest Woolies moved around the town before finally occupying the site previously occupied by the Red Lion.
Trade directories in the 20th century suggest Woolies moved around the town before finally occupying the site previously occupied by the Red Lion. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 15

5:03pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done? Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 30

5:33pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Marlow Mum says...

Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...
Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice... Marlow Mum
  • Score: -19

5:34pm Tue 28 Jan 14

NonProphet says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception." NonProphet
  • Score: -33

6:24pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Dickitdo says...

Marlow Mum wrote:
Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...
James Corden did not go to the Grammar School ,he went to Sir William Ramsey Hazelmere
[quote][p][bold]Marlow Mum[/bold] wrote: Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...[/p][/quote]James Corden did not go to the Grammar School ,he went to Sir William Ramsey Hazelmere Dickitdo
  • Score: 17

6:27pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Marlow Mum says...

Dickitdo wrote:
Marlow Mum wrote:
Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...
James Corden did not go to the Grammar School ,he went to Sir William Ramsey Hazelmere
Exactly my point. I refered to 'non-grammar' schools...
[quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marlow Mum[/bold] wrote: Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...[/p][/quote]James Corden did not go to the Grammar School ,he went to Sir William Ramsey Hazelmere[/p][/quote]Exactly my point. I refered to 'non-grammar' schools... Marlow Mum
  • Score: -17

6:52pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Dickitdo says...

NonProphet wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."
You had best be getting some years in , Then possibly you would be able to impass serious words of wisdom to the comments of this post
[quote][p][bold]NonProphet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."[/p][/quote]You had best be getting some years in , Then possibly you would be able to impass serious words of wisdom to the comments of this post Dickitdo
  • Score: 25

7:05pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Dickitdo says...

NonProphet wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."
When I walked round Eden I had a good mobile phone signal. can not remember seeing a garden though,I walked past the Library I knew what it was I read it on the front , Call it something else and me and quite a few others may become more confused, So just leave it !.
[quote][p][bold]NonProphet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."[/p][/quote]When I walked round Eden I had a good mobile phone signal. can not remember seeing a garden though,I walked past the Library I knew what it was I read it on the front , Call it something else and me and quite a few others may become more confused, So just leave it !. Dickitdo
  • Score: 25

8:14pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Marsbarmad says...

Actually James Cordon went to Holmer Green I think you'll find.
Actually James Cordon went to Holmer Green I think you'll find. Marsbarmad
  • Score: -3

8:35pm Tue 28 Jan 14

NonProphet says...

Dickitdo wrote:
NonProphet wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."
You had best be getting some years in , Then possibly you would be able to impass serious words of wisdom to the comments of this post
Impass? https://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=G2y8Sx4B
2Sk
[quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]NonProphet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."[/p][/quote]You had best be getting some years in , Then possibly you would be able to impass serious words of wisdom to the comments of this post[/p][/quote]Impass? https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=G2y8Sx4B 2Sk NonProphet
  • Score: -24

10:20pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Marlow Mum wrote:
Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...
I see there is no byline on it and there are amateurish mistakes - is this a piece of free 'journalism' by an immature pupil at the Grammar School trying to show us all what a remarkable place his school is?
[quote][p][bold]Marlow Mum[/bold] wrote: Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...[/p][/quote]I see there is no byline on it and there are amateurish mistakes - is this a piece of free 'journalism' by an immature pupil at the Grammar School trying to show us all what a remarkable place his school is? Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 7

10:37pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

NonProphet wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."
The reason I say it is not just that I love hating Sir Terry Pratchett - it is that I remember the bickering over whether to name Slough Library after a Conservative Councillor - that divided on party lines and, if I remember aright, there was something similar with the Reggie Goves Centre. I think learning and knowledge should be something people hold in common and a repository of those things like the library is better not named after an individual. The library, although it is part of the BCC Library Service today, is the culmination of the efforts of various 19th century philanthropists and public benefactors and I think it would be better kept under its present name rather than being attached to a highly-talented local man of our own age.


(You haven’t answered my question - does Terry Pratchett know you are doing this and has he confirmed he has no objection?)
[quote][p][bold]NonProphet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."[/p][/quote]The reason I say it is not just that I love hating Sir Terry Pratchett - it is that I remember the bickering over whether to name Slough Library after a Conservative Councillor - that divided on party lines and, if I remember aright, there was something similar with the Reggie Goves Centre. I think learning and knowledge should be something people hold in common and a repository of those things like the library is better not named after an individual. The library, although it is part of the BCC Library Service today, is the culmination of the efforts of various 19th century philanthropists and public benefactors and I think it would be better kept under its present name rather than being attached to a highly-talented local man of our own age. (You haven’t answered my question -[italic] does[/italic] Terry Pratchett know you are doing this and has he confirmed he has no objection?) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 19

10:58pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

NonProphet wrote:
Dickitdo wrote:
NonProphet wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."
You had best be getting some years in , Then possibly you would be able to impass serious words of wisdom to the comments of this post
Impass? https://www.youtube.

com/watch?v=G2y8Sx4B

2Sk
Looks as if the spellchecker has 'corrected' the word 'impart' (this was a favourite excuse of a certain blogger) - I try and switch off automatic spelling corrections except for ones that I know I want done. (They can be used as a way of pasting words you use lots of times.)
[quote][p][bold]NonProphet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]NonProphet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]"Some people just love to hate. Some people could walk round the Garden of Eden and they'd moan about the lack of mobile reception."[/p][/quote]You had best be getting some years in , Then possibly you would be able to impass serious words of wisdom to the comments of this post[/p][/quote]Impass? https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=G2y8Sx4B 2Sk[/p][/quote]Looks as if the spellchecker has 'corrected' the word 'impart' (this was a favourite excuse of a certain blogger) - I try and switch off automatic spelling corrections except for ones that I know I want done. (They can be used as a way of pasting words you use lots of times.) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 19

11:17pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

I haven't checked this but I seem to remember the latest interpretation of the villa on the Rye is that it was probably seasonal accommodation for harvest workers (hence the large bath house) rather than:

... the centre of a large estate with several outlying farms.
I haven't checked this but I seem to remember the latest interpretation of the villa on the Rye is that it was probably seasonal accommodation for harvest workers (hence the large bath house) rather than: [italic] ... the centre of a large estate with several outlying farms. [/italic] Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 11

11:22pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

miccles wrote:
chepping100 wrote:
More things the Bucks Free Press did not know about Wycombe.

"The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.".

Not true,
as well as Woolworths, the Chilterns shopping centre included The Palace cinema, a branch of Barclays Bank, The Red Cow pub and Lipton’s supermarket on Frogmoor and Hepworth’s taylors on Church St.

Yet more lazy ‘journalism’ from the Bucks Free Press.
Wasn't the Red Cow pub further up the road near the railway bridge?
and Tesco's was there too, and over the road was the bus station.
I think it was the Red Cross Knight - named after the Templars who gave their name to Temple End.
[quote][p][bold]miccles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chepping100[/bold] wrote: More things the Bucks Free Press did not know about Wycombe. "The whole of the Chiltern Arcade was originally occupied by a Woolworths store.". Not true, as well as Woolworths, the Chilterns shopping centre included The Palace cinema, a branch of Barclays Bank, The Red Cow pub and Lipton’s supermarket on Frogmoor and Hepworth’s taylors on Church St. Yet more lazy ‘journalism’ from the Bucks Free Press.[/p][/quote]Wasn't the Red Cow pub further up the road near the railway bridge? and Tesco's was there too, and over the road was the bus station.[/p][/quote]I think it was the Red Cross Knight - named after the Templars who gave their name to Temple End. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 13

11:26pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Actually you may be right - Judson’s 1875 Wycombe Directory, page 68, says there was a pub called the Red Cow at number 16 Frogmoor Gardens.
Actually you may be right - Judson’s 1875 Wycombe Directory, page 68, says there was a pub called the Red Cow at number 16 Frogmoor Gardens. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 10

11:28pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Mind you the Council, and the Corporation before them, 'recycle' pub and street names - Watery Lane and the Golden Fleece are examples.
Mind you the Council, and the Corporation before them, 'recycle' pub and street names - Watery Lane and the Golden Fleece are examples. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 11

11:41pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Lauded poet TS Eliot …

So T.S. Eliot was a poet then - I often wondered why he was famous!
[italic] Lauded poet TS Eliot … [/italic] So T.S. Eliot was a poet then - I often wondered why he was famous! Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 7

11:45pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Actually you may be right - Judson’s 1875 Wycombe Directory, page 68, says there was a pub called the Red Cow at number 16 Frogmoor Gardens.
LOL!

Just followed Chepping100's 12.37 link - you WERE right!
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Actually you may be right - Judson’s 1875 Wycombe Directory, page 68, says there was a pub called the Red Cow at number 16 Frogmoor Gardens.[/p][/quote]LOL! Just followed Chepping100's 12.37 link - you WERE right! Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 9

12:08am Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Thank you for that Chepping - a fascinating link - I don't feel so old now!
Thank you for that Chepping - a fascinating link - I don't feel so old now! Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 9

12:24am Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Thank you for alerting me to a fascinating website Chepping.
Thank you for alerting me to a fascinating website Chepping. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 9

12:41am Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Marlow Mum wrote:
Dickitdo wrote:
Marlow Mum wrote:
Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...
James Corden did not go to the Grammar School ,he went to Sir William Ramsey Hazelmere
Exactly my point. I refered to 'non-grammar' schools...
That is not the point - what is he doing in a feature that refers to schools in High Wycombe?

Eleven plus failures are NON-PEOPLE below the radar like black Americans in the days of Jim Crow - Wycombe is supposed to be a bastion of EXCELLENCE!
[quote][p][bold]Marlow Mum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marlow Mum[/bold] wrote: Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...[/p][/quote]James Corden did not go to the Grammar School ,he went to Sir William Ramsey Hazelmere[/p][/quote]Exactly my point. I refered to 'non-grammar' schools...[/p][/quote]That is not the point - what is he doing in a feature that refers to schools in High Wycombe? Eleven plus failures are NON-PEOPLE below the radar like black Americans in the days of Jim Crow - Wycombe is supposed to be a bastion of EXCELLENCE! Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 9

1:21am Wed 29 Jan 14

big don g the 1st says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
I reckon it is Sir Terry posting...
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]I reckon it is Sir Terry posting... big don g the 1st
  • Score: 21

1:32am Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

big don g the 1st wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?
I reckon it is Sir Terry posting...
Hadn't thought of that - could be worse though:

'The Ivor Bigun Library'.
[quote][p][bold]big don g the 1st[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Let's just leave it as High Wycombe Library - does Sir Terry know this is being done?[/p][/quote]I reckon it is Sir Terry posting...[/p][/quote]Hadn't thought of that - could be worse though: 'The Ivor Bigun Library'. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 17

1:34am Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

(A public library for members of the public who are over 60, not women or members of a racial minority and it would have to be moved back to the old library building.)
(A public library for members of the public who are over 60, not women or members of a racial minority and it would have to be moved back to the old library building.) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 12

1:39am Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Lauded poet TS Eliot …

So T.S. Eliot was a poet then - I often wondered why he was famous!
And: ... nineteenth century prime minister Benjamin Disraeli ...
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [italic] Lauded poet TS Eliot … [/italic] So T.S. Eliot was a poet then - I often wondered why he was famous![/p][/quote]And: [italic] ... nineteenth century prime minister Benjamin Disraeli ... [/italic] Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 9

2:00am Wed 29 Jan 14

J B Blackett says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Lauded poet TS Eliot …

So T.S. Eliot was a poet then - I often wondered why he was famous!
And: ... nineteenth century prime minister Benjamin Disraeli ...
And Disraeli was merely the second Prime Minister to be based in Wycombe .
Any more prime suspects in the Town ?
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [italic] Lauded poet TS Eliot … [/italic] So T.S. Eliot was a poet then - I often wondered why he was famous![/p][/quote]And: [italic] ... nineteenth century prime minister Benjamin Disraeli ... [/italic][/p][/quote]And Disraeli was merely the second Prime Minister to be based in Wycombe . Any more prime suspects in the Town ? J B Blackett
  • Score: 11

9:30am Wed 29 Jan 14

Ivor'sbestfriend says...

Marlow Mum wrote:
Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...
James Corden is best forgotten.
[quote][p][bold]Marlow Mum[/bold] wrote: Sooooo... noone of note from any of the other local non-grammar schools eh? James Corden (amongst doubtless others) may have something to say about that. Also, noone female of any note. Lazy reporting BFP. If you're going to write such an article, at least do it justice...[/p][/quote]James Corden is best forgotten. Ivor'sbestfriend
  • Score: 20

2:10pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Monty Cristo says...

Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above.
As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there!
Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above. As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there! Monty Cristo
  • Score: 7

10:44pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Monty Cristo wrote:
Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above.
As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there!
Lots of people mention that.
[quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above. As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there![/p][/quote]Lots of people mention that. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 5

10:48pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(A public library for members of the public who are over 60, not women or members of a racial minority and it would have to be moved back to the old library building.)
(The magnificent and iconic library with its traditional wooden librarians and magnificent library gardens.)
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (A public library for members of the public who are over 60, not women or members of a racial minority and it would have to be moved back to the old library building.)[/p][/quote](The magnificent and iconic library with its traditional wooden librarians and magnificent library gardens.) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 5

10:54pm Wed 29 Jan 14

J B Blackett says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above.
As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there!
Lots of people mention that.
Yes - Time does fly.
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above. As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there![/p][/quote]Lots of people mention that.[/p][/quote]Yes - Time does fly. J B Blackett
  • Score: 6

11:01pm Wed 29 Jan 14

JustJus says...

Howard Jones!
Howard Jones! JustJus
  • Score: -10

11:29pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

J B Blackett wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above.
As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there!
Lots of people mention that.
Yes - Time does fly.
Groan.
[quote][p][bold]J B Blackett[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: Murrays dept store was mentioned in a post above. As a kid for some reason I loved the rising and falling clock in there![/p][/quote]Lots of people mention that.[/p][/quote]Yes - Time does fly.[/p][/quote]Groan. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 4

3:24am Thu 30 Jan 14

J B Blackett says...

JustJus wrote:
Howard Jones!
That happy chap from Wycombe who sang (sings?) overly cheerful songs , used to upset his neighbours on Green Street with the noise he made while practicing.
.
But now he lives most of his time in Ireland he upsets his neighbours over there instead.
.
Some people like to be upset a lot as that gives some purpose and perceived meaning to their lives.
[quote][p][bold]JustJus[/bold] wrote: Howard Jones![/p][/quote]That happy chap from Wycombe who sang (sings?) overly cheerful songs , used to upset his neighbours on Green Street with the noise he made while practicing. . But now he lives most of his time in Ireland he upsets his neighbours over there instead. . Some people like to be upset a lot as that gives some purpose and perceived meaning to their lives. J B Blackett
  • Score: -13

1:01pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

… the famous pupils of the town's grammar schools


‘The town’s grammar schools’ - this looks a bit like a subliminal push for ‘selection’ 70% of local children don’t see the inside of them and the majority of Bucks grammar school places go to out-of-county and privately educated children, not to Bucks state educated children.


That should have been ‘the famous pupils of grammar schools situated in this area’.
[italic]… the famous pupils of the town's grammar schools [/italic] ‘The [italic] town’s[/italic] grammar schools’ - this looks a bit like a subliminal push for ‘selection’ 70% of local children don’t see the inside of them and the majority of Bucks grammar school places go to out-of-county and privately educated children, not to Bucks state educated children. That should have been ‘the famous pupils of grammar schools situated in this area’. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: -2

1:05pm Thu 30 Jan 14

legiopatrianostra says...

Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.
Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema. legiopatrianostra
  • Score: 2

11:48pm Thu 30 Jan 14

J B Blackett says...

legiopatrianostra wrote:
Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.
According to the internet , The Royal Military College was first located on Wycombe High Street , adjacent to No 11 (Baker's Oven)
This initial establishment was reputedly founded by a Lt Col Le Marchant (later a Major General)
.
Subsequently a separate academy for Junior Officers / Cadets (Cavalry and Infantry) was created and located in Marlow , whilst the existing one in Wycombe then became the academy for Senior Officers.
.
.
When the Marlow one relocated to Sandhurst , the Senior academy remained in Wycombe before it too eventually moved to Sandhurst to become part of what became known as the Staff College.
.
Most of the above occurred during the early years of the 19th century
[quote][p][bold]legiopatrianostra[/bold] wrote: Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.[/p][/quote]According to the internet , The Royal Military College was first located on Wycombe High Street , adjacent to No 11 (Baker's Oven) This initial establishment was reputedly founded by a Lt Col Le Marchant (later a Major General) . Subsequently a separate academy for Junior Officers / Cadets (Cavalry and Infantry) was created and located in Marlow , whilst the existing one in Wycombe then became the academy for Senior Officers. . . When the Marlow one relocated to Sandhurst , the Senior academy remained in Wycombe before it too eventually moved to Sandhurst to become part of what became known as the Staff College. . Most of the above occurred during the early years of the 19th century J B Blackett
  • Score: 4

12:11am Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

J B Blackett wrote:
legiopatrianostra wrote:
Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.
According to the internet , The Royal Military College was first located on Wycombe High Street , adjacent to No 11 (Baker's Oven)
This initial establishment was reputedly founded by a Lt Col Le Marchant (later a Major General)
.
Subsequently a separate academy for Junior Officers / Cadets (Cavalry and Infantry) was created and located in Marlow , whilst the existing one in Wycombe then became the academy for Senior Officers.
.
.
When the Marlow one relocated to Sandhurst , the Senior academy remained in Wycombe before it too eventually moved to Sandhurst to become part of what became known as the Staff College.
.
Most of the above occurred during the early years of the 19th century
From: http://www.army.mod.
uk/documents/general
/history_of_rmas.pdf


The Royal Military College was formed in 1800 in response to the disasters experienced by the British Army in the early campaigns of the French Revolutionary War. Its founder was Major General John Gaspard Le Marchant, a cavalry officer who studied his profession seriously and had the ear of King George III. He planned a college consisting of three parts. The Senior Department would train officers in staff duties. The Junior Department, similar to the RMA but with less emphasis on science and technology, would train gentlemen cadets to be junior officers. The Legion, made up of the sons of non-commissioned officers, would act as a demonstration battalion and at the same time give these boys an education to fit them as future NCOs. The Senior Department was formed at High Wycombe from a school privately founded in 1799 by General Jarry, a French émigré. It moved to Farnham in 1814, from where it joined the Junior Department at Sandhurst in 1821. In 1858 it was renamed the Staff College and in 1862 took over its new building at Camberley, at the edge of the Sandhurst estate. It remained there, sharing many facilities with the cadet college, later the RMAS, until 1998 when it was amalgamated with the Royal Naval and Royal Air Force Staff Colleges to form the Joint Service Command and Staff College, now at Shrivenham. The Legion was eventually formed at Chelsea as the Duke of York's School, now at Dover, but did not become part of RMC.

The Junior Department of the RMC, formed as a college of gentlemen cadets, began in 1802 at Remnatz, a converted country house at Great Marlow. When the experiment proved successful, a new site was purchased at Sandhurst Park, Berkshire, where, after several false starts, the new Royal Military College (now Old College, RMAS) was first occupied in 1812.


The Dictionary of National Biography says:

Le Marchant, John Gaspard (1766–1812) … Through the patronage of the duke of York, on 6 April 1797 Le Marchant was appointed lieutenant-colonel without purchase in Hompesch's hussars, moving rapidly to the 29th light dragoons on 29 May and finally to the 7th Queen's Own light dragoons on 1 June, where he insisted on rigorous training, mastery of tactics, and personal commitment by officers. In Flanders he had witnessed the professional ineptitude of staff officers and, in 1798, he began drafting a scheme for a national military college. The duke of York, the commander-in-chief, on being sounded out, observed: ‘I can hardly recommend you to sacrifice your time and talents to a project which seems so very unlikely to succeed’ (Le Marchant, 65). Nevertheless, Le Marchant refined his ideas in ‘An outline of a plan for a regular course of military instruction’ for infantry and cavalry officers, envisaging one department dealing with staff duties, the second for cadets seeking their first commission, and a third to provide an educational grounding for entrants to the second department. In addition, a ‘legion’ of 200 potential non-commissioned officers would train alongside cadets of the second department. In March 1799 he recorded a more favourable response from the duke of York, and on 4 May an embryo first (senior) department, the staff training college, opened in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, with Le Marchant as commandant. In December the duke of York chaired a committee which approved the first two departments, rejected the third and the legion, and awarded Le Marchant £500 to cover ‘the unavoidable expenses to which he has been exposed during the long period in which he has been engaged in this undertaking’ (ibid., 99). A royal warrant, issued on 24 June 1801, formally established the Royal Military College with General Sir William Harcourt (who had been his commander in Flanders) as governor, and Le Marchant himself as lieutenant-governor and superintendent-gener
al at an annual salary of £300. On 17 May 1802 the second (junior) department was opened at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, with Lieutenant-Colonel James Butler appointed its superintendent, and later its commandant. Le Marchant remained at High Wycombe as lieutenant-governor, with oversight of both departments, each of which had its own commandant. However, he found Butler resentful of his perceived interference, and, disappointingly, Harcourt proved an unhelpful absentee. He strove hard at High Wycombe to overcome the antipathy of students to academic subjects; but he was, in practice, powerless to improve standards at Marlow. Plans to build a new college for co-location of the two departments at Sandhurst Park on Bagshot Heath in Surrey made little headway, and Le Marchant's further proposal for organization of an army general staff gained scant support. To Colonel William Stewart he expressed despair at the intransigent, narrow-minded prejudice he faced. Stewart acknowledged his ‘cruel difficulties’ but urged him to ‘persevere, and this country must be grateful at last’ (Thoumine, 105). In January 1807 he had to defend himself before a board of general officers against accusations of calumny by Harcourt, after he had once more complained to the governor of inefficiency at Marlow. The following year he was refused permission to train the Portuguese army and was thus condemned to ‘the old humdrum routine I am heartily tired of’ (ibid., 127).

Le Marchant had gone on half pay as a lieutenant-colonel in 1803, had been promoted colonel on 30 October 1805, and in 1808 was re-designated ‘lieutenant-govern
or and inspector-general of instructions ’ at the Royal Military College, with a total annual income of £1898. In addition, he had a colonel's pay and the proceeds of private rents in Guernsey. He was promoted major-general on 4 June 1811 and shortly afterwards visited Sandhurst to see the progress of work on the college. Within a week he received notification ‘that your situation at the College is incompatible with your rank in the Army’ (Thoumine, 140). Le Marchant protested to the duke of York that he had devoted twelve years to developing an organization which had trained more than 200 staff- and 1500 regimental officers. He said that he would, nevertheless, ‘cheerfully’ resume an active career, but ‘respectfully’ drew attention to the annual loss of £500, which would adversely affect his large family, especially in view of additional need to support a major-general's ‘establishment’ abroad. ‘Great pecuniary difficulties’ were inevitable; and he further remarked to his brother-in-law, Colonel Tom Carey, that ‘all I want is bread’ (ibid., 142–3).

To no avail. On 25 July 1811 Le Marchant returned to the active list as lieutenant-colonel in the 6th dragoon guards, and on 10 August he sailed from Portsmouth to command the heavy brigade in the Peninsula. Within days of arriving in Lisbon he learned that Mary had died after giving birth to their tenth child. He was present at the capture of Ciudad Rodrigo, on 20 January 1812, and at Llerena on 19 April 1812 when he scattered two French regiments of cavalry with three squadrons of the 5th dragoon guards. At the battle of Salamanca on 22 July, Le Marchant's brigade was posted at the right centre of the allies. Ordered to ‘charge at all hazards’ (Thoumine, 191) in support of Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Pakenham's flank attack, shortly after 5 p.m. Le Marchant rode his 1000-strong brigade decisively forward to complete the rout of the French left, personally cutting down six of the enemy. Then, leading a detachment of the 4th light dragoons in a minor skirmish after the main action, he fell, mortally wounded. In Pakenham's words, he ‘died sabre in hand giving the most princely example’ (Longford, 354). Two days later he was buried in an olive grove near the village of Los Arapiles, close to Salamanca. Parliament voted an annual pension of £1000 to his family and £1500 for a memorial to him in St Paul's Cathedral, London.
[quote][p][bold]J B Blackett[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]legiopatrianostra[/bold] wrote: Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.[/p][/quote]According to the internet , The Royal Military College was first located on Wycombe High Street , adjacent to No 11 (Baker's Oven) This initial establishment was reputedly founded by a Lt Col Le Marchant (later a Major General) . Subsequently a separate academy for Junior Officers / Cadets (Cavalry and Infantry) was created and located in Marlow , whilst the existing one in Wycombe then became the academy for Senior Officers. . . When the Marlow one relocated to Sandhurst , the Senior academy remained in Wycombe before it too eventually moved to Sandhurst to become part of what became known as the Staff College. . Most of the above occurred during the early years of the 19th century[/p][/quote]From: http://www.army.mod. uk/documents/general /history_of_rmas.pdf [italic] The Royal Military College was formed in 1800 in response to the disasters experienced by the British Army in the early campaigns of the French Revolutionary War. Its founder was Major General John Gaspard Le Marchant, a cavalry officer who studied his profession seriously and had the ear of King George III. He planned a college consisting of three parts. The Senior Department would train officers in staff duties. The Junior Department, similar to the RMA but with less emphasis on science and technology, would train gentlemen cadets to be junior officers. The Legion, made up of the sons of non-commissioned officers, would act as a demonstration battalion and at the same time give these boys an education to fit them as future NCOs. The Senior Department was formed at High Wycombe from a school privately founded in 1799 by General Jarry, a French émigré. It moved to Farnham in 1814, from where it joined the Junior Department at Sandhurst in 1821. In 1858 it was renamed the Staff College and in 1862 took over its new building at Camberley, at the edge of the Sandhurst estate. It remained there, sharing many facilities with the cadet college, later the RMAS, until 1998 when it was amalgamated with the Royal Naval and Royal Air Force Staff Colleges to form the Joint Service Command and Staff College, now at Shrivenham. The Legion was eventually formed at Chelsea as the Duke of York's School, now at Dover, but did not become part of RMC. The Junior Department of the RMC, formed as a college of gentlemen cadets, began in 1802 at Remnatz, a converted country house at Great Marlow. When the experiment proved successful, a new site was purchased at Sandhurst Park, Berkshire, where, after several false starts, the new Royal Military College (now Old College, RMAS) was first occupied in 1812. [/italic] The Dictionary of National Biography says: [italic] Le Marchant, John Gaspard (1766–1812) … Through the patronage of the duke of York, on 6 April 1797 Le Marchant was appointed lieutenant-colonel without purchase in Hompesch's hussars, moving rapidly to the 29th light dragoons on 29 May and finally to the 7th Queen's Own light dragoons on 1 June, where he insisted on rigorous training, mastery of tactics, and personal commitment by officers. In Flanders he had witnessed the professional ineptitude of staff officers and, in 1798, he began drafting a scheme for a national military college. The duke of York, the commander-in-chief, on being sounded out, observed: ‘I can hardly recommend you to sacrifice your time and talents to a project which seems so very unlikely to succeed’ (Le Marchant, 65). Nevertheless, Le Marchant refined his ideas in ‘An outline of a plan for a regular course of military instruction’ for infantry and cavalry officers, envisaging one department dealing with staff duties, the second for cadets seeking their first commission, and a third to provide an educational grounding for entrants to the second department. In addition, a ‘legion’ of 200 potential non-commissioned officers would train alongside cadets of the second department. In March 1799 he recorded a more favourable response from the duke of York, and on 4 May an embryo first (senior) department, the staff training college, opened in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, with Le Marchant as commandant. In December the duke of York chaired a committee which approved the first two departments, rejected the third and the legion, and awarded Le Marchant £500 to cover ‘the unavoidable expenses to which he has been exposed during the long period in which he has been engaged in this undertaking’ (ibid., 99). A royal warrant, issued on 24 June 1801, formally established the Royal Military College with General Sir William Harcourt (who had been his commander in Flanders) as governor, and Le Marchant himself as lieutenant-governor and superintendent-gener al at an annual salary of £300. On 17 May 1802 the second (junior) department was opened at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, with Lieutenant-Colonel James Butler appointed its superintendent, and later its commandant. Le Marchant remained at High Wycombe as lieutenant-governor, with oversight of both departments, each of which had its own commandant. However, he found Butler resentful of his perceived interference, and, disappointingly, Harcourt proved an unhelpful absentee. He strove hard at High Wycombe to overcome the antipathy of students to academic subjects; but he was, in practice, powerless to improve standards at Marlow. Plans to build a new college for co-location of the two departments at Sandhurst Park on Bagshot Heath in Surrey made little headway, and Le Marchant's further proposal for organization of an army general staff gained scant support. To Colonel William Stewart he expressed despair at the intransigent, narrow-minded prejudice he faced. Stewart acknowledged his ‘cruel difficulties’ but urged him to ‘persevere, and this country must be grateful at last’ (Thoumine, 105). In January 1807 he had to defend himself before a board of general officers against accusations of calumny by Harcourt, after he had once more complained to the governor of inefficiency at Marlow. The following year he was refused permission to train the Portuguese army and was thus condemned to ‘the old humdrum routine [which] I am heartily tired of’ (ibid., 127). Le Marchant had gone on half pay as a lieutenant-colonel in 1803, had been promoted colonel on 30 October 1805, and in 1808 was re-designated ‘lieutenant-govern or and inspector-general of instructions [sic]’ at the Royal Military College, with a total annual income of £1898. In addition, he had a colonel's pay and the proceeds of private rents in Guernsey. He was promoted major-general on 4 June 1811 and shortly afterwards visited Sandhurst to see the progress of work on the college. Within a week he received notification ‘that your situation at the College is incompatible with your rank in the Army’ (Thoumine, 140). Le Marchant protested to the duke of York that he had devoted twelve years to developing an organization which had trained more than 200 staff- and 1500 regimental officers. He said that he would, nevertheless, ‘cheerfully’ resume an active career, but ‘respectfully’ drew attention to the annual loss of £500, which would adversely affect his large family, especially in view of additional need to support a major-general's ‘establishment’ abroad. ‘Great pecuniary difficulties’ were inevitable; and he further remarked to his brother-in-law, Colonel Tom Carey, that ‘all I want is bread’ (ibid., 142–3). To no avail. On 25 July 1811 Le Marchant returned to the active list as lieutenant-colonel in the 6th dragoon guards, and on 10 August he sailed from Portsmouth to command the heavy brigade in the Peninsula. Within days of arriving in Lisbon he learned that Mary had died after giving birth to their tenth child. He was present at the capture of Ciudad Rodrigo, on 20 January 1812, and at Llerena on 19 April 1812 when he scattered two French regiments of cavalry with three squadrons of the 5th dragoon guards. At the battle of Salamanca on 22 July, Le Marchant's brigade was posted at the right centre of the allies. Ordered to ‘charge at all hazards’ (Thoumine, 191) in support of Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Pakenham's flank attack, shortly after 5 p.m. Le Marchant rode his 1000-strong brigade decisively forward to complete the rout of the French left, personally cutting down six of the enemy. Then, leading a detachment of the 4th light dragoons in a minor skirmish after the main action, he fell, mortally wounded. In Pakenham's words, he ‘died sabre in hand giving the most princely example’ (Longford, 354). Two days later he was buried in an olive grove near the village of Los Arapiles, close to Salamanca. Parliament voted an annual pension of £1000 to his family and £1500 for a memorial to him in St Paul's Cathedral, London. [/italic] Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 2

12:13am Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Now you all KNOW.
Now you all KNOW. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 7

12:14am Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

(I would like to thank Milo the Dog for discovering those quotes - Good Boy!)
(I would like to thank Milo the Dog for discovering those quotes - Good Boy!) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 4

12:18am Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

(In return for a reasonable of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
(In return for a reasonable of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 4

12:19am Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.) Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 5

12:26am Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Here are a selection of ten facts, about the town…
Surely that should say ‘ Here IS a selection of ten facts, about the town (Only one selection.)


And why isn’t the word ‘facts’ in inverted commas - or did the spellchecker alter it from ‘factoids’?
[italic] Here are a selection of ten facts, about the town…[/italic] Surely that should say ‘[italic] Here [bold] IS[/bold] a selection of ten facts, about the town [/italic] (Only one selection.) And why isn’t the word ‘facts’ in inverted commas - or did the spellchecker alter it from ‘factoids’?[italic] [/italic] Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 0

11:40am Fri 31 Jan 14

chepping100 says...

legiopatrianostra wrote:
Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.
Chiltern shopping centre did not comprise of the old Tescos. As can be seen from the photo in this link, the old Tesco was next to the Salvation Army and was demolished to build the Black’s store (now closed).

https://www.facebook
.com/photo.php?fbid=
375714295869621&set=
a.372222876218763.85
656.372180262889691&
type=1&theater
[quote][p][bold]legiopatrianostra[/bold] wrote: Prior to Sandhurst, Royal Military College went to Marlow opposite Borlase's School, Chiltern's shopping centre (Frogmoor side), was primarily the old Tescos and Palace theatre/cinema.[/p][/quote]Chiltern shopping centre did not comprise of the old Tescos. As can be seen from the photo in this link, the old Tesco was next to the Salvation Army and was demolished to build the Black’s store (now closed). https://www.facebook .com/photo.php?fbid= 375714295869621&set= a.372222876218763.85 656.372180262889691& type=1&theater chepping100
  • Score: 5

1:11pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Until I saw the photo of the former Red Cow I had forgotten it completely but I must have walked past it dozens of times in the 70s and may even have had a drink in there.
Until I saw the photo of the former Red Cow I had forgotten it completely but I must have walked past it dozens of times in the 70s and may even have had a drink in there. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 6

10:29pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Desperate Housewife says...

Totteridge Gent wrote:
When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...
Well said, Totteridge Gent.
[quote][p][bold]Totteridge Gent[/bold] wrote: When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...[/p][/quote]Well said, Totteridge Gent. Desperate Housewife
  • Score: -8

2:07am Sat 1 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Desperate Housewife wrote:
Totteridge Gent wrote:
When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...
Well said, Totteridge Gent.
I feel sure I speak for most people in High Wycombe when I say that I agree with Desperate Housewife.
[quote][p][bold]Desperate Housewife[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Totteridge Gent[/bold] wrote: When used as a possessive, its doesn't have an apostrophe. The Domesday book is also spelled incorrectly. Tsk, tsk...[/p][/quote]Well said, Totteridge Gent.[/p][/quote]I feel sure I speak for most people in High Wycombe when I say that I agree with Desperate Housewife. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: -9

2:13am Sat 1 Feb 14

J B Blackett says...

We agree with all agreeable folk
We agree with all agreeable folk J B Blackett
  • Score: 5

2:19am Sat 1 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Well I agree with that - I must go to bed now but if you agree with me (and the Desperate Housewife) over that then I will agree with you tomorrow lunchtime - agreed?
Well I agree with that - I must go to bed now but if you agree with me (and the Desperate Housewife) over that then I will agree with you tomorrow lunchtime - agreed? Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 3

8:16pm Sat 1 Feb 14

Dickitdo says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
was that an echo or did you post that twice. He He
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]was that an echo or did you post that twice. He He Dickitdo
  • Score: 7

8:21pm Sat 1 Feb 14

J B Blackett says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Well I agree with that - I must go to bed now but if you agree with me (and the Desperate Housewife) over that then I will agree with you tomorrow lunchtime - agreed?
A greed at lunchtime ?
.
Only if we are unnecessarily very very hungry
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: Well I agree with that - I must go to bed now but if you agree with me (and the Desperate Housewife) over that then I will agree with you tomorrow lunchtime - agreed?[/p][/quote]A greed at lunchtime ? . Only if we are unnecessarily very very hungry J B Blackett
  • Score: 5

12:23am Sun 2 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
was that an echo or did you post that twice. He He
I suppose I like repeating myself.
[quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]was that an echo or did you post that twice. He He[/p][/quote]I suppose I like repeating myself. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 5

12:23am Sun 2 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

I suppose I like repeating myself.
I suppose I like repeating myself. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 5

12:32am Sun 2 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
Bring back Alan Cleaver.
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]Bring back Alan Cleaver. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 3

12:57am Sun 2 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

I Love Ivor wrote:
Edgar Brooks wrote:
I Love Ivor wrote:
swearmeister wrote:
Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm
Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.
Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.
Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply.

Having checked on the internet there Is also 'as far as I can see' no mention of Woolworths being where the Chilterns currently is. Even a lot of the Historical sites by people who are obviously far older than I am do not mention this fact!
Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply.



Oh yes there is - a man who calls himself 'Ivor's Best Friend' is fair game for anything!
[quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Edgar Brooks[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]I Love Ivor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swearmeister[/bold] wrote: Woolworths - the whole of the Chilterns? Really? Hmmmmm[/p][/quote]Woolworths as far as I am aware has only ever been on the High Street. That used to run from the High Street up to Castle Street.[/p][/quote]Obviously you don't know High Wycombe as well as you think you do. Older residents will clearly remember shopping in the old store.[/p][/quote]Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply. Having checked on the internet there Is also 'as far as I can see' no mention of Woolworths being where the Chilterns currently is. Even a lot of the Historical sites by people who are obviously far older than I am do not mention this fact![/p][/quote][quote]Notice I put 'As far as I am aware', no need for the rude reply.[/quote] Oh yes there is - a man who calls himself 'Ivor's Best Friend' is fair game for anything! Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 7

1:57am Sun 2 Feb 14

Dickitdo says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
I suppose I like repeating myself.
Pardon .
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: I suppose I like repeating myself.[/p][/quote]Pardon . Dickitdo
  • Score: 9

2:29am Sun 2 Feb 14

Dickitdo says...

F. W. George Ironmongers and Gunsmiths used to be where Tesco in Frogmore was built , Georges I think closed down in the early 1960s ,about the time the cattle market in Dovecote closed down .
F. W. George Ironmongers and Gunsmiths used to be where Tesco in Frogmore was built , Georges I think closed down in the early 1960s ,about the time the cattle market in Dovecote closed down . Dickitdo
  • Score: 13

11:58am Sun 2 Feb 14

Dickitdo says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
Bring back Alan Cleaver.
What about Fred Ginger !
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]Bring back Alan Cleaver.[/p][/quote]What about Fred Ginger ! Dickitdo
  • Score: 8

1:47pm Sun 2 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
Bring back Alan Cleaver.
What about Fred Ginger !
Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'.


I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.
[quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]Bring back Alan Cleaver.[/p][/quote]What about Fred Ginger ![/p][/quote]Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'. I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 6

3:35pm Sun 2 Feb 14

Dickitdo says...

Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
Bring back Alan Cleaver.
What about Fred Ginger !
Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'.


I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.
Fred Ginger was a B.F,P,hack. back in the day
[quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]Bring back Alan Cleaver.[/p][/quote]What about Fred Ginger ![/p][/quote]Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'. I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.[/p][/quote]Fred Ginger was a B.F,P,hack. back in the day Dickitdo
  • Score: 7

4:04pm Sun 2 Feb 14

J B Blackett says...

Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
Bring back Alan Cleaver.
What about Fred Ginger !
Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'.


I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.
Fred Ginger was a B.F,P,hack. back in the day
We used to pat and feed a hack (in riding stables) who was a nice russet colour and strangely was called 'Ginger' (but didn't have first name) .
.
Do you think there is a connection ?
.
Probably not as we don't think a horse would be capable of using a keyboard / typewriter unless it was a huge very robust one - or unless he/she had a secretary / typist who could understand him/her when he/she 'spoke' .
.
It's a funny old life - being a horse. And the hours are good until humans have no use for you. And if you used to work down a coal-mine - that was not nice at all. According to some distant Northern relatives.
[quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]Bring back Alan Cleaver.[/p][/quote]What about Fred Ginger ![/p][/quote]Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'. I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.[/p][/quote]Fred Ginger was a B.F,P,hack. back in the day[/p][/quote]We used to pat and feed a hack (in riding stables) who was a nice russet colour and strangely was called 'Ginger' (but didn't have first name) . . Do you think there is a connection ? . Probably not as we don't think a horse would be capable of using a keyboard / typewriter unless it was a huge very robust one - or unless he/she had a secretary / typist who could understand him/her when he/she 'spoke' . . It's a funny old life - being a horse. And the hours are good until humans have no use for you. And if you used to work down a coal-mine - that was not nice at all. According to some distant Northern relatives. J B Blackett
  • Score: 11

1:35am Wed 5 Feb 14

Dickitdo says...

J B Blackett wrote:
Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Dickitdo wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
Undercover Euro Yob wrote:
(In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)
Bring back Alan Cleaver.
What about Fred Ginger !
Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'.


I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.
Fred Ginger was a B.F,P,hack. back in the day
We used to pat and feed a hack (in riding stables) who was a nice russet colour and strangely was called 'Ginger' (but didn't have first name) .
.
Do you think there is a connection ?
.
Probably not as we don't think a horse would be capable of using a keyboard / typewriter unless it was a huge very robust one - or unless he/she had a secretary / typist who could understand him/her when he/she 'spoke' .
.
It's a funny old life - being a horse. And the hours are good until humans have no use for you. And if you used to work down a coal-mine - that was not nice at all. According to some distant Northern relatives.
Horrible life for a horse , down a pit , they kept banging their heads . Not quite so bad for a pony though, maybe thats why they invented the pit pony.
[quote][p][bold]J B Blackett[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dickitdo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Undercover Euro Yob[/bold] wrote: (In return for a reasonable quantity of nice bones Milo would be willing put his services at the disposal of the lamentably ignorant hack who wrote the article above.)[/p][/quote]Bring back Alan Cleaver.[/p][/quote]What about Fred Ginger ![/p][/quote]Don't know who Fred Ginger was - Alan Cleaver was 'Wycombe Star' editor who used to write ignorant stuff - really borderline imaginative writing or fantasy about 'local history' that never happened and 'the paranormal'. I must be honest; the article above, though it's hardly well-researched, isn't quite as bad as Cleaver's stuff.[/p][/quote]Fred Ginger was a B.F,P,hack. back in the day[/p][/quote]We used to pat and feed a hack (in riding stables) who was a nice russet colour and strangely was called 'Ginger' (but didn't have first name) . . Do you think there is a connection ? . Probably not as we don't think a horse would be capable of using a keyboard / typewriter unless it was a huge very robust one - or unless he/she had a secretary / typist who could understand him/her when he/she 'spoke' . . It's a funny old life - being a horse. And the hours are good until humans have no use for you. And if you used to work down a coal-mine - that was not nice at all. According to some distant Northern relatives.[/p][/quote]Horrible life for a horse , down a pit , they kept banging their heads . Not quite so bad for a pony though, maybe thats why they invented the pit pony. Dickitdo
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