Schools announce closures ahead of tomorrow's teaching strike

Bucks Free Press: NUT members during strike action last October NUT members during strike action last October

SEVERAL schools in south Bucks have announced they will be shutting completely on Wednesday due to a planned teacher’s strike.

Kings Wood School in High Wycombe and Manor Farm Junior School in Hazlemere are among those that will be completely closed to pupils.

Other schools affected include Great Marlow School and Ash Hill, in High Wycombe, which will both be partially closed.

More schools are expected to be added to the Buckinghamshire County Council list before Wednesday – announcing both full and partial closures.

Some schools, including Highworth Combined School in High Wycombe, have told parents they will be fully closed but have not yet been included on the county council’s closures list.

Similarly, Hamilton Academy, also in High Wycombe, has informed parents it will be partially closed - to Year 1 and 6 pupils, as well as to class 2M – and Wye Valley School has said pupils in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 should not attend, while the school will be open to other year groups.

Other schools have issued similar advice to parents.

Members of the NUT teaching union are intending to take industrial action as part of an on-going campaign against planned and implemented changes to national pay, conditions and pensions.

Bucks NUT Secretary, Annette Pryce, said: "Teacher workload is unsustainable and the thought of doing the job until 68 is driving many away from the job.

"Teacher morale is at dangerously low levels. Children need teachers who are fresh and well motivated, not tired and demoralised. All the polls show that Michael Gove is out of touch with teachers and parents - he must listen and change direction.”

For the full list of confirmed closures and partial closures on Buckinghamshire County Council’s website, click here.

For up to date information parents and carers are advised to check directly with the relevant schools.

NOTE: The Buckinghamshire County Council school closures list did not seem to be working correctly as of 9am on Tuesday morning (March 25), and stated there were no planned closures ahead. NUT strike action is continuing as previously indicated, however, and the web page is working again this afternoon.

Comments (29)

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8:45am Tue 25 Mar 14

gpn01 says...

The BCC page link says that there are no closures. Does that mean that the action has been called off?
The BCC page link says that there are no closures. Does that mean that the action has been called off? gpn01
  • Score: 2

10:58am Tue 25 Mar 14

educationbod says...

Looks like the local authority hare having a hissy fit... perhaps instead of being petulant they could just be open and transparent with their information......
Looks like the local authority hare having a hissy fit... perhaps instead of being petulant they could just be open and transparent with their information...... educationbod
  • Score: 2

4:45pm Tue 25 Mar 14

tigeran says...

More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born! tigeran
  • Score: -12

5:05pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Monty Cristo says...

tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
[quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment. Monty Cristo
  • Score: 5

5:39pm Tue 25 Mar 14

page3 says...

Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
[quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers". page3
  • Score: -2

6:05pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Monty Cristo says...

page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
Why?
[quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".[/p][/quote]Why? Monty Cristo
  • Score: 1

7:52pm Tue 25 Mar 14

page3 says...

Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
Why?
Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.
[quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".[/p][/quote]Why?[/p][/quote]Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about. page3
  • Score: 1

8:05pm Tue 25 Mar 14

missingtwick says...

Shame it doesn't mention all the schools that are staying open because the teachers who didn't vote for strike action are working. I'm fed up of it, as are most union members. It's not working because none wants to strike anymore - we can't afford it for one thing!! My union membership is for career support and, frankly, insurance incase a claim is made against me or I need professional representation. I don't pay my membership fee to not do my job.
Shame it doesn't mention all the schools that are staying open because the teachers who didn't vote for strike action are working. I'm fed up of it, as are most union members. It's not working because none wants to strike anymore - we can't afford it for one thing!! My union membership is for career support and, frankly, insurance incase a claim is made against me or I need professional representation. I don't pay my membership fee to not do my job. missingtwick
  • Score: 14

8:06pm Tue 25 Mar 14

missingtwick says...

Sorry for the typo there; no one wants to strike anymore (apart from aforementioned vocal minority).
Sorry for the typo there; no one wants to strike anymore (apart from aforementioned vocal minority). missingtwick
  • Score: 1

8:26pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Monty Cristo says...

page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
Why?
Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.
No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.
[quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".[/p][/quote]Why?[/p][/quote]Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.[/p][/quote]No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk. Monty Cristo
  • Score: 7

10:57pm Tue 25 Mar 14

retchub says...

here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .
here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. . retchub
  • Score: 1

11:08pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Nick1958 says...

retchub wrote:
here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .
Only 5 and a half days? You've obviously never been a teacher!
[quote][p][bold]retchub[/bold] wrote: here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .[/p][/quote]Only 5 and a half days? You've obviously never been a teacher! Nick1958
  • Score: -1

11:24pm Tue 25 Mar 14

BOOKERite says...

Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
Why?
Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.
No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.
If you are that unhappy with your teaching career, you could always find another job, or perhaps you know where you are better off.
[quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".[/p][/quote]Why?[/p][/quote]Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.[/p][/quote]No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.[/p][/quote]If you are that unhappy with your teaching career, you could always find another job, or perhaps you know where you are better off. BOOKERite
  • Score: -5

7:50am Wed 26 Mar 14

Bookermum says...

I used to teach, & now I'm a full time mum!!
Will I ever go back to teaching?? No!!
Is it because I'm lazy?? No!!
Did I help at after school clubs?? Yes.
Was this paid work?? No!!
It's because my priories have now changed!!
I used to work 7-6 at school, go home have tea etc then work until 10.
This was most nights!!
School holidays ... Paperwork & display time. Time to sort & clean the equipment used by the children etc.
Was I the only teacher doing these hours?? No way, I fact there was probably only one or two out of a large teaching staff who didn't do these hours!!
Was I paid for the hours I worked?? No way!!
I have now decided that bringing up my children is much more important than teaching other people's children! I want a job that is set hours and you get paid what you work!! When I am ready to go back to work I will be looking for a job with set hours and that I can stop & forget about when I am home!
Too many people 'think' they know all about teaching without actually experiencing it!!
Try the job for a week or two and then you will be in a position to complain about how little teacher do!!
I used to teach, & now I'm a full time mum!! Will I ever go back to teaching?? No!! Is it because I'm lazy?? No!! Did I help at after school clubs?? Yes. Was this paid work?? No!! It's because my priories have now changed!! I used to work 7-6 at school, go home have tea etc then work until 10. This was most nights!! School holidays ... Paperwork & display time. Time to sort & clean the equipment used by the children etc. Was I the only teacher doing these hours?? No way, I fact there was probably only one or two out of a large teaching staff who didn't do these hours!! Was I paid for the hours I worked?? No way!! I have now decided that bringing up my children is much more important than teaching other people's children! I want a job that is set hours and you get paid what you work!! When I am ready to go back to work I will be looking for a job with set hours and that I can stop & forget about when I am home! Too many people 'think' they know all about teaching without actually experiencing it!! Try the job for a week or two and then you will be in a position to complain about how little teacher do!! Bookermum
  • Score: 3

8:42am Wed 26 Mar 14

piran says...

For goodness sake teachers stop disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. You again prove to be selfish and not acting as "professionals". If you do not like the job then do something else but stop this blackmail.
Of the NUT's 326,930 members only 40% could be bothered to vote! A poor example to the children they teach and profess to care for.
This is naked self interest to keep their nice secure jobs and reduce their work despite huge holidays.
For goodness sake teachers stop disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. You again prove to be selfish and not acting as "professionals". If you do not like the job then do something else but stop this blackmail. Of the NUT's 326,930 members only 40% could be bothered to vote! A poor example to the children they teach and profess to care for. This is naked self interest to keep their nice secure jobs and reduce their work despite huge holidays. piran
  • Score: 1

8:48am Wed 26 Mar 14

piran says...

OK teachers try working zero hours contracts, or being forced to be self-employed with NO holidays or paid time off to even go to the doctor. No training, no development, no pension, no security.
NOW STOP COMPLAINING AND GET BACK TO WORK
OK teachers try working zero hours contracts, or being forced to be self-employed with NO holidays or paid time off to even go to the doctor. No training, no development, no pension, no security. NOW STOP COMPLAINING AND GET BACK TO WORK piran
  • Score: 2

8:52am Wed 26 Mar 14

Bill Taxpayer says...

Nick1958 wrote:
retchub wrote:
here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .
Only 5 and a half days? You've obviously never been a teacher!
Yes, but he means five and a half days for 48 weeks of the year, not 38.
[quote][p][bold]Nick1958[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retchub[/bold] wrote: here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .[/p][/quote]Only 5 and a half days? You've obviously never been a teacher![/p][/quote]Yes, but he means five and a half days for 48 weeks of the year, not 38. Bill Taxpayer
  • Score: 1

2:03pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Nick1958 says...

Bill Taxpayer wrote:
Nick1958 wrote:
retchub wrote:
here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .
Only 5 and a half days? You've obviously never been a teacher!
Yes, but he means five and a half days for 48 weeks of the year, not 38.
Read Bookermum, above. This is the reality. So many people think they know what teaching entails and, in reality, are completely ignorant of the facts.
[quote][p][bold]Bill Taxpayer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nick1958[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retchub[/bold] wrote: here we go again moaning teachers !!! try joining the retail sector where i work 5 and a half days which includes every saturday. no pension scheme either. 4 weeks holiday . and i.m still working at 70 as i cannot really afford to retire. .[/p][/quote]Only 5 and a half days? You've obviously never been a teacher![/p][/quote]Yes, but he means five and a half days for 48 weeks of the year, not 38.[/p][/quote]Read Bookermum, above. This is the reality. So many people think they know what teaching entails and, in reality, are completely ignorant of the facts. Nick1958
  • Score: 1

10:59pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Monty Cristo says...

BOOKERite wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
Why?
Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.
No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.
If you are that unhappy with your teaching career, you could always find another job, or perhaps you know where you are better off.
Actually, I am not a teacher so your helpful comment is of no use. I know teachers, and my daughter is a teacher. I know how hard they work. Anyway, imply saying "if you don't like it, don't object, just leave" is hardly helpful is it? Mr Gove is harming education in a big way. Why should he be allowed to do it?
[quote][p][bold]BOOKERite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".[/p][/quote]Why?[/p][/quote]Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.[/p][/quote]No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.[/p][/quote]If you are that unhappy with your teaching career, you could always find another job, or perhaps you know where you are better off.[/p][/quote]Actually, I am not a teacher so your helpful comment is of no use. I know teachers, and my daughter is a teacher. I know how hard they work. Anyway, imply saying "if you don't like it, don't object, just leave" is hardly helpful is it? Mr Gove is harming education in a big way. Why should he be allowed to do it? Monty Cristo
  • Score: 0

11:17pm Wed 26 Mar 14

retchub says...

if you cannot stand the heart get out of the kitchen !!!!!
if you cannot stand the heart get out of the kitchen !!!!! retchub
  • Score: 3

11:19pm Wed 26 Mar 14

retchub says...

surely you knew what the job entailed before taking it on !!!!!!!!!!!!! so stop maoning
surely you knew what the job entailed before taking it on !!!!!!!!!!!!! so stop maoning retchub
  • Score: 3

7:04am Thu 27 Mar 14

demoness the second says...

@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school.
Is that why you are so bitter?
@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school. Is that why you are so bitter? demoness the second
  • Score: 0

8:29am Thu 27 Mar 14

piran says...

demoness the second wrote:
@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school.
Is that why you are so bitter?
What a useless and silly comment to make on the debate about the 40% of NUT members who caused a strike disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. Facts are they can leave. Fact is many in the private sector have zero hours, no security and no pensions. Fact is professionals do not strike. Fact is modern schools have huge amounts of help from teaching assistants etc, that were not there 20 years ago.
Some schools now have 50% non-teaching staff to help the teachers. Perhaps teachers just like complaining?
[quote][p][bold]demoness the second[/bold] wrote: @ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school. Is that why you are so bitter?[/p][/quote]What a useless and silly comment to make on the debate about the 40% of NUT members who caused a strike disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. Facts are they can leave. Fact is many in the private sector have zero hours, no security and no pensions. Fact is professionals do not strike. Fact is modern schools have huge amounts of help from teaching assistants etc, that were not there 20 years ago. Some schools now have 50% non-teaching staff to help the teachers. Perhaps teachers just like complaining? piran
  • Score: 2

4:12pm Thu 27 Mar 14

BOOKERite says...

Monty Cristo wrote:
BOOKERite wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
page3 wrote:
Monty Cristo wrote:
tigeran wrote:
More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born!
It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.
I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".
Why?
Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.
No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.
If you are that unhappy with your teaching career, you could always find another job, or perhaps you know where you are better off.
Actually, I am not a teacher so your helpful comment is of no use. I know teachers, and my daughter is a teacher. I know how hard they work. Anyway, imply saying "if you don't like it, don't object, just leave" is hardly helpful is it? Mr Gove is harming education in a big way. Why should he be allowed to do it?
I too know and have known some absolutely brilliant Teachers, some of them enjoy their job and are still teaching and some have left the profession because they were unhappy. Like I said, we all have a choice which career to follow, if some Teachers are that unhappy then they can leave and follow a career they enjoy.
[quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BOOKERite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]page3[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Monty Cristo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]tigeran[/bold] wrote: More disruption from the public sector. They don't know they are born![/p][/quote]It's completely clear you know nothing about the work that teachers do, or about the reasons behind their protest. Lazy comment.[/p][/quote]I think you need to correct that to "a small minority of teachers".[/p][/quote]Why?[/p][/quote]Because there aren't valid reasons so the previous posters comments seem reasonable. With only 22% of NUTs voting for strike action, yet again a vocal minority are acting like the children they claim to care about.[/p][/quote]No valid reasons? Perhaps you could state what reasons you believe to be invalid. Do you actually want teachers to work 12-14+ hour days (actually, some do already!)? Do you want them to have vastly reduced lesson preparation time? Do you think incessant curriculum changes can be accommodated with no planning time allocated? Do you believe that schools will be given adequate extra staff to accommodate Mr Gove's plans to allow young children to attend from 8am to 6pm? Do you really think such attendance is good for the children and/or family life? Do you believe that teachers should be paid less per hour relatively compared to child minders? Do believe those who say that teachers get 6 week holidays so are well off (hint: just because kids are away for 6 weeks it doesn't mean that teachers do no work in that time). I could go on. My sympathy lies with the teachers who are standing up against the measures that Mr Gove (who as far as I know has never spent time teaching 30 kids) is intending to introduce. The man hasn't got a clue about the reality, what he does like to do however is talk the talk.[/p][/quote]If you are that unhappy with your teaching career, you could always find another job, or perhaps you know where you are better off.[/p][/quote]Actually, I am not a teacher so your helpful comment is of no use. I know teachers, and my daughter is a teacher. I know how hard they work. Anyway, imply saying "if you don't like it, don't object, just leave" is hardly helpful is it? Mr Gove is harming education in a big way. Why should he be allowed to do it?[/p][/quote]I too know and have known some absolutely brilliant Teachers, some of them enjoy their job and are still teaching and some have left the profession because they were unhappy. Like I said, we all have a choice which career to follow, if some Teachers are that unhappy then they can leave and follow a career they enjoy. BOOKERite
  • Score: 1

7:24pm Thu 27 Mar 14

retchub says...

demoness the second wrote:
@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school.
Is that why you are so bitter?
sorry i spelt MOANING WRONG !!!!!!!!!!!
[quote][p][bold]demoness the second[/bold] wrote: @ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school. Is that why you are so bitter?[/p][/quote]sorry i spelt MOANING WRONG !!!!!!!!!!! retchub
  • Score: 1

6:41am Fri 28 Mar 14

demoness the second says...

retchub wrote:
demoness the second wrote:
@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school.
Is that why you are so bitter?
sorry i spelt MOANING WRONG !!!!!!!!!!!
And I assume you meant heat not heart? ;)
[quote][p][bold]retchub[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]demoness the second[/bold] wrote: @ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school. Is that why you are so bitter?[/p][/quote]sorry i spelt MOANING WRONG !!!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]And I assume you meant heat not heart? ;) demoness the second
  • Score: 0

6:56am Fri 28 Mar 14

demoness the second says...

piran wrote:
demoness the second wrote:
@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school.
Is that why you are so bitter?
What a useless and silly comment to make on the debate about the 40% of NUT members who caused a strike disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. Facts are they can leave. Fact is many in the private sector have zero hours, no security and no pensions. Fact is professionals do not strike. Fact is modern schools have huge amounts of help from teaching assistants etc, that were not there 20 years ago.
Some schools now have 50% non-teaching staff to help the teachers. Perhaps teachers just like complaining?
these people on zero hours etc - sadly they are normally the lowest paid workers, not highly qualified professionals. Therefore it is not comparable.

Here is what a teacher wrote on one of the other news stories about teaching and also working in the private sector. I am sure you will not believe it but still...

"As someone who left the teaching profession less than a year ago to work in the private sector, let me enlighten you. In my new job I work fewer hours for more pay, receive an annual bonus if I perform well and benefit from private health care. I no longer have to work through my breaks, take work home with me or work during the weekend. Sure, I get shorter holidays but I can choose when to take them... and I don’t have to work during my holidays as I did before. Contrary to what the media would have you believe, my teachers’ pension wasn’t ‘Gold Plated’ and my private sector pension is almost as good. I can also choose to take my private sector pension at any time after the age of 55 and not be forced to work until I’m 67. I wasn’t a member of the NUT, the union that is striking next week, and I don’t agree with the strike action that NUT members are taking but I do know that teaching is a difficult and thankless job and the people who do it are the most hard-working I know."


Piran - I cannot comment about the striking, like many of the teachers I do doubt that it will do any good. But as someone who has a relative who is completely burnt out by the job I will not have anyone implying that they have it easy.
There was a phone in on 3 counties yesterday, A chap there said his daughter had always wanted to be a teacher. She studied, got the qualifications and became one.
Three years later, she was so disillusioned,stress
ed and exhausted with the constant demands of the job, and the increasing amount of paperwork that she was expected to do that she quit.
Teaching is not the same as it was 20 years ago. Governments keep changing the goal posts, OFSTED keep inspecting and children and parents get ruder and ruder.
As you say, if teachers do not like it they can leave.
Sadly many of them are doing just that. It is not the answer. We need teachers.
[quote][p][bold]piran[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]demoness the second[/bold] wrote: @ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school. Is that why you are so bitter?[/p][/quote]What a useless and silly comment to make on the debate about the 40% of NUT members who caused a strike disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. Facts are they can leave. Fact is many in the private sector have zero hours, no security and no pensions. Fact is professionals do not strike. Fact is modern schools have huge amounts of help from teaching assistants etc, that were not there 20 years ago. Some schools now have 50% non-teaching staff to help the teachers. Perhaps teachers just like complaining?[/p][/quote]these people on zero hours etc - sadly they are normally the lowest paid workers, not highly qualified professionals. Therefore it is not comparable. Here is what a teacher wrote on one of the other news stories about teaching and also working in the private sector. I am sure you will not believe it but still... "As someone who left the teaching profession less than a year ago to work in the private sector, let me enlighten you. In my new job I work fewer hours for more pay, receive an annual bonus if I perform well and benefit from private health care. I no longer have to work through my breaks, take work home with me or work during the weekend. Sure, I get shorter holidays but I can choose when to take them... and I don’t have to work during my holidays as I did before. Contrary to what the media would have you believe, my teachers’ pension wasn’t ‘Gold Plated’ and my private sector pension is almost as good. I can also choose to take my private sector pension at any time after the age of 55 and not be forced to work until I’m 67. I wasn’t a member of the NUT, the union that is striking next week, and I don’t agree with the strike action that NUT members are taking but I do know that teaching is a difficult and thankless job and the people who do it are the most hard-working I know." Piran - I cannot comment about the striking, like many of the teachers I do doubt that it will do any good. But as someone who has a relative who is completely burnt out by the job I will not have anyone implying that they have it easy. There was a phone in on 3 counties yesterday, A chap there said his daughter had always wanted to be a teacher. She studied, got the qualifications and became one. Three years later, she was so disillusioned,stress ed and exhausted with the constant demands of the job, and the increasing amount of paperwork that she was expected to do that she quit. Teaching is not the same as it was 20 years ago. Governments keep changing the goal posts, OFSTED keep inspecting and children and parents get ruder and ruder. As you say, if teachers do not like it they can leave. Sadly many of them are doing just that. It is not the answer. We need teachers. demoness the second
  • Score: 1

8:39am Fri 28 Mar 14

piran says...

demoness the second wrote:
piran wrote:
demoness the second wrote:
@ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school.
Is that why you are so bitter?
What a useless and silly comment to make on the debate about the 40% of NUT members who caused a strike disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. Facts are they can leave. Fact is many in the private sector have zero hours, no security and no pensions. Fact is professionals do not strike. Fact is modern schools have huge amounts of help from teaching assistants etc, that were not there 20 years ago.
Some schools now have 50% non-teaching staff to help the teachers. Perhaps teachers just like complaining?
these people on zero hours etc - sadly they are normally the lowest paid workers, not highly qualified professionals. Therefore it is not comparable.

Here is what a teacher wrote on one of the other news stories about teaching and also working in the private sector. I am sure you will not believe it but still...

"As someone who left the teaching profession less than a year ago to work in the private sector, let me enlighten you. In my new job I work fewer hours for more pay, receive an annual bonus if I perform well and benefit from private health care. I no longer have to work through my breaks, take work home with me or work during the weekend. Sure, I get shorter holidays but I can choose when to take them... and I don’t have to work during my holidays as I did before. Contrary to what the media would have you believe, my teachers’ pension wasn’t ‘Gold Plated’ and my private sector pension is almost as good. I can also choose to take my private sector pension at any time after the age of 55 and not be forced to work until I’m 67. I wasn’t a member of the NUT, the union that is striking next week, and I don’t agree with the strike action that NUT members are taking but I do know that teaching is a difficult and thankless job and the people who do it are the most hard-working I know."


Piran - I cannot comment about the striking, like many of the teachers I do doubt that it will do any good. But as someone who has a relative who is completely burnt out by the job I will not have anyone implying that they have it easy.
There was a phone in on 3 counties yesterday, A chap there said his daughter had always wanted to be a teacher. She studied, got the qualifications and became one.
Three years later, she was so disillusioned,stress

ed and exhausted with the constant demands of the job, and the increasing amount of paperwork that she was expected to do that she quit.
Teaching is not the same as it was 20 years ago. Governments keep changing the goal posts, OFSTED keep inspecting and children and parents get ruder and ruder.
As you say, if teachers do not like it they can leave.
Sadly many of them are doing just that. It is not the answer. We need teachers.
An interesting addition to our knowledge about teaching. But I do have to comment -
1; zero hours are not just for low paid workers I know professionals who are highly qualified with first, and second degrees on zero hours.
2: Are you implying teachers are highly qualified professionals? Not sure about that one.
3. Change has been always going on in education, I was a parent governor and in the 1980s and 1990 there was budgeting (Local Management of Schools (LMS), core curricula introduced into primary schools etc etc, so change is NOT new - it's just that teachers cannot cope with change and prefer to strike and complain rather than get on with it. They should try business if they really want rapid change.
I am a qualified teacher and I prefer the business environment. They also have a choice to leave.
[quote][p][bold]demoness the second[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]piran[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]demoness the second[/bold] wrote: @ retchub -looking at your spelling, it is evident that you did not go to school. Is that why you are so bitter?[/p][/quote]What a useless and silly comment to make on the debate about the 40% of NUT members who caused a strike disrupting parents' lives and holding back children's education. Facts are they can leave. Fact is many in the private sector have zero hours, no security and no pensions. Fact is professionals do not strike. Fact is modern schools have huge amounts of help from teaching assistants etc, that were not there 20 years ago. Some schools now have 50% non-teaching staff to help the teachers. Perhaps teachers just like complaining?[/p][/quote]these people on zero hours etc - sadly they are normally the lowest paid workers, not highly qualified professionals. Therefore it is not comparable. Here is what a teacher wrote on one of the other news stories about teaching and also working in the private sector. I am sure you will not believe it but still... "As someone who left the teaching profession less than a year ago to work in the private sector, let me enlighten you. In my new job I work fewer hours for more pay, receive an annual bonus if I perform well and benefit from private health care. I no longer have to work through my breaks, take work home with me or work during the weekend. Sure, I get shorter holidays but I can choose when to take them... and I don’t have to work during my holidays as I did before. Contrary to what the media would have you believe, my teachers’ pension wasn’t ‘Gold Plated’ and my private sector pension is almost as good. I can also choose to take my private sector pension at any time after the age of 55 and not be forced to work until I’m 67. I wasn’t a member of the NUT, the union that is striking next week, and I don’t agree with the strike action that NUT members are taking but I do know that teaching is a difficult and thankless job and the people who do it are the most hard-working I know." Piran - I cannot comment about the striking, like many of the teachers I do doubt that it will do any good. But as someone who has a relative who is completely burnt out by the job I will not have anyone implying that they have it easy. There was a phone in on 3 counties yesterday, A chap there said his daughter had always wanted to be a teacher. She studied, got the qualifications and became one. Three years later, she was so disillusioned,stress ed and exhausted with the constant demands of the job, and the increasing amount of paperwork that she was expected to do that she quit. Teaching is not the same as it was 20 years ago. Governments keep changing the goal posts, OFSTED keep inspecting and children and parents get ruder and ruder. As you say, if teachers do not like it they can leave. Sadly many of them are doing just that. It is not the answer. We need teachers.[/p][/quote]An interesting addition to our knowledge about teaching. But I do have to comment - 1; zero hours are not just for low paid workers I know professionals who are highly qualified with first, and second degrees on zero hours. 2: Are you implying teachers are highly qualified professionals? Not sure about that one. 3. Change has been always going on in education, I was a parent governor and in the 1980s and 1990 there was budgeting (Local Management of Schools (LMS), core curricula introduced into primary schools etc etc, so change is NOT new - it's just that teachers cannot cope with change and prefer to strike and complain rather than get on with it. They should try business if they really want rapid change. I am a qualified teacher and I prefer the business environment. They also have a choice to leave. piran
  • Score: 0

1:09pm Sat 29 Mar 14

Monty Cristo says...

The problem is Piran is that if every teacher jacked it in because of overwork and moved into the private sector (as you chose to do , evidently) where would the education system be then? Isn't it right to try and campaign for reasonable hours, adequate prep time etc etc? If no-one objects, it will be the education of our children that will suffer. Is that what you and the others who lambast the teachers really want?
Furthermore, I am not sure how you can say that you are a qualified teacher at the same time as denying that teachers are highly qualified professionals. Does a degree plus years of further training not equate to being "highly qualified" compared to a typical zero hours worker then? then? If not, what does?
Just to add also that I was a Deputy Chair of governors about 12 years ago. I completely agree that change has always happened, and always will. But if the pace of change increases while the time you are allocated to plan that change is continually eroded, then something is drastically wrong and something has to give. With teachers already working long, long hours, should they really be expected to take up the slack? I don't think so.
Any decent private company these days is proud of maintaining a work/life balance for employees, realising that for optimum productivity a reasonable balance needs to be achieved. Mr Gove cares nothing for that. He expects to drive teachers into the ground , with, as I say, catastrophic consequences for our children's education. In a way he does not care about that, he cares about making nice sound bytes about getting better value, and more help for parents, leading up to an election.
Mark my words, unless he funds it properly and reduces teachers working hours, it will all come back to haunt us all.
The problem is Piran is that if every teacher jacked it in because of overwork and moved into the private sector (as you chose to do , evidently) where would the education system be then? Isn't it right to try and campaign for reasonable hours, adequate prep time etc etc? If no-one objects, it will be the education of our children that will suffer. Is that what you and the others who lambast the teachers really want? Furthermore, I am not sure how you can say that you are a qualified teacher at the same time as denying that teachers are highly qualified professionals. Does a degree plus years of further training not equate to being "highly qualified" compared to a typical zero hours worker then? then? If not, what does? Just to add also that I was a Deputy Chair of governors about 12 years ago. I completely agree that change has always happened, and always will. But if the pace of change increases while the time you are allocated to plan that change is continually eroded, then something is drastically wrong and something has to give. With teachers already working long, long hours, should they really be expected to take up the slack? I don't think so. Any decent private company these days is proud of maintaining a work/life balance for employees, realising that for optimum productivity a reasonable balance needs to be achieved. Mr Gove cares nothing for that. He expects to drive teachers into the ground , with, as I say, catastrophic consequences for our children's education. In a way he does not care about that, he cares about making nice sound bytes about getting better value, and more help for parents, leading up to an election. Mark my words, unless he funds it properly and reduces teachers working hours, it will all come back to haunt us all. Monty Cristo
  • Score: 0

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