Headteacher chosen for role helping struggling schools

Headteacher chosen for role helping struggling schools

Headteacher chosen for role helping struggling schools

First published in News
Last updated
by , Reporter

THE HEADTEACHER at a Marlow school has been selected for a top role supporting schools facing challenging circumstances.

Peter Holding, of Sir William Borlase’s Grammar School, is one of only 144 headteachers to be appointed a National Leader of Education (NLE) in the latest recruitment round.

He will use use his track record of success and professionalism as a school leader to provide leadership, support and advice to other schools in need of help.

And Borlase has also been named a National Support School, which will see other teachers and staff providing assistance to struggling schools.

Dr Holding said: "I’m delighted to receive this recognition on behalf of the school. As a National Support School we will have the opportunity to work closely with other schools, locally and further afield, which will benefit our own staff immensely.

"It is wonderful to receive recognition for all of the outstanding work being done across the school."

The scheme is tailor-made to suit the needs of each school in need of support, or those in transition to federation or academy status.

The type of help provided is flexible and can involve NLEs becoming acting or executive headteacher of those in transition.

For instance, Wye Valley School in Bourne End, which was placed into special measures last year, had help from successful Wycombe High School last year.

And after providing staff support, assistant head of the girls' school Andrea Jacobson made the switch to take on the headship at the struggling school, which is now undergoing a transformation to an academy.

Schools chosen also have responsibility for bringing on the next generation of NLEs and National Support Schools.

Dr Holding is also the Chairman of Trustees at Buckinghamshire Learning Trust, and was previously a Trustee at the National Association for Able Children in Education (NACE).

Many who are involved with the scheme report improved exam results at the schools they support, as well as their own.

Charlie Taylor, Chief Executive of the National College for Teaching and Leadership, said: "It’s great that heads like Peter are willing to look beyond their own school gates to help more and more pupils achieve.

"We now have over 1000 National Leaders of Education and their efforts are at the heart of a self-improving, school-led education system.

"School-to-school support is having a growing impact and the results speak for themselves with benefits for both the schools being supported and those providing the support."

Successful heads will be invited to attend a formal induction and training for the role in driving school improvement.

Dr Holding took up the headship at Borlase in 1998 and has overseen a successful period in the school’s history, which dates back to 1624.

He was at the helm when Borlase became a specialist performing rights school, as well as when it made the transformation into an academy in 2011.

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

1:07pm Tue 6 May 14

BucksComment says...

Well done to a great Headmaster and school.

However......

This is another step in the total privatisation of schools, with the provision of paid for professional services becoming more important than the education of the kids actually at the school
Well done to a great Headmaster and school. However...... This is another step in the total privatisation of schools, with the provision of paid for professional services becoming more important than the education of the kids actually at the school BucksComment
  • Score: 5

3:50pm Tue 6 May 14

MunsterX says...

Yes, more excuses to sex up the pay packages of head teachers and others involved in school management. Mammon is at the heart of this and we shall soon have a situation similar to the private sector whereby leaders are paid many times the salary of the average worker.
Yes, more excuses to sex up the pay packages of head teachers and others involved in school management. Mammon is at the heart of this and we shall soon have a situation similar to the private sector whereby leaders are paid many times the salary of the average worker. MunsterX
  • Score: -2

12:32am Fri 9 May 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

I hope Dr Holding will not be embarrassed, (if he reads this) to see me say that he is clearly a man of high intelligence and intellectual achievement. He has no ‘LinkedIn’ page that I can find but according to Zoom Info, before becoming ‘Head Teacher Borlase & Co’ he was ‘Deputy Head, Head of English and Head of Drama’ and ‘Teacher of English and Film Studies’ at the University of Michigan. He has a PhD in English Literature from the same University as well as a Masters from the Shakespeare Institute, and has worked for many years on the board of NACE, the National Association for Able Children in Education, which according to its website is ‘the only dedicated, not for profit organisation, specialising in supporting teachers to provide excellent teaching and learning for able, gifted and talented pupils’ and ‘we support teachers in getting the best from able, gifted and talented pupils in the everyday classroom, whilst enabling all pupils to flourish.’ Zoom Info may be confusing things here (details for UoM are repeated) but he has also been ‘a Deputy Head, Head of English and Head of Drama in schools in Warwickshire and London as well as a teacher of English and Film Studies at the University of Michigan’.
This is clearly the sort of man any parent would want influencing the development of their child even if they wanted their child to become an engineer or a mathematician rather than a person whose life was founded on literature and history.

It is a shame to my mind to see Dr Holding participating in a first aid fix for the highly-divisive Bucks Education system in what is not too different to a PR job for the ‘selective’ education ‘system’ in some ways. The inconsistent ‘selective’ system in this county is the cause of failing schools by concentrating a higher level of talent, aspirations and syllabus in one set of schools and largely letting the others stagger on as best as they can - until earlier this year Mike Appleyard the BCC ‘Cabinet member’ for education and an avowed ‘fan’ of ‘selection’ was head of the governors of the Wye Valley School at Bourne End until it was placed in ‘special measures’ - someone who ought to have been highly placed to ensure the school maintained the high standards BCC claims it prides itself on was unable to prevent his school losing out in the musical chairs of ‘failing’ status and ‘special measures’ that secondary moderns are involved in.
There are always failing secondary modern schools in special measures in this county and DfE performance statistics in this paper in the past suggest some schools not in special measures do less well than schools that are. Selective schools that do well out of selection are one half of the problem (for which reason they have been got rid of in other counties some of them Conservative-governe
d ones) but here they are brought in to give a temporary fix to the schools who are hobbled by selection - thereby transforming themselves from part of the problem into part of a ‘solution’ to the problem.
The idea that one artificially successful school helps a nearby failing school, always reminds me of the rich women in Victorian society who were the beneficiaries of massive inequalities of wealth in society and would engage in acts of ‘generosity’ by giving useful objects and small sums of money to the poor, old and disabled.
The whole education system in this county is based on the idea that - far from ‘…enabling all pupils to flourish’ - some children are not really worth educating to a very high level, or exposing to the kind of educational influence that a man like Dr Holding can give, and that these children can be left unchallenged, and their potential unexplored and undeveloped.
’He will use use his track record of success and professionalism as a school leader to provide leadership, support and advice to other schools in need of help.’



How will he fo about doing that? If Dr Holding’s experiences are in helping ‘Able Children’ and his aptitudes are in the fields of literature and film then what help is he going to give to the staff of schools that largely have the less able and less aspirational children concentrated in them, and that are not supposed to challenge or function in the same way as grammar schools?

Bastions of selective excellence like SWBGS - genuinely beneficial though they are to their own pupils - are part of the problems with our educational system in this county, rather than a solution or a model to be aspired to.
I hope Dr Holding will not be embarrassed, (if he reads this) to see me say that he is clearly a man of high intelligence and intellectual achievement. He has no ‘LinkedIn’ page that I can find but according to Zoom Info, before becoming ‘Head Teacher Borlase & Co’ he was ‘Deputy Head, Head of English and Head of Drama’ and ‘Teacher of English and Film Studies’ at the University of Michigan. He has a PhD in English Literature from the same University as well as a Masters from the Shakespeare Institute, and has worked for many years on the board of NACE, the National Association for Able Children in Education, which according to its website is ‘the only dedicated, not for profit organisation, specialising in supporting teachers to provide excellent teaching and learning for able, gifted and talented pupils’ and ‘we support teachers in getting the best from able, gifted and talented pupils in the everyday classroom, whilst enabling all pupils to flourish.’ Zoom Info may be confusing things here (details for UoM are repeated) but he has also been ‘a Deputy Head, Head of English and Head of Drama in schools in Warwickshire and London as well as a teacher of English and Film Studies at the University of Michigan’. This is clearly the sort of man any parent would want influencing the development of their child even if they wanted their child to become an engineer or a mathematician rather than a person whose life was founded on literature and history. It is a shame to my mind to see Dr Holding participating in a first aid fix for the highly-divisive Bucks Education system in what is not too different to a PR job for the ‘selective’ education ‘system’ in some ways. The inconsistent ‘selective’ system in this county is the cause of failing schools by concentrating a higher level of talent, aspirations and syllabus in one set of schools and largely letting the others stagger on as best as they can - until earlier this year Mike Appleyard the BCC ‘Cabinet member’ for education and an avowed ‘fan’ of ‘selection’ was head of the governors of the Wye Valley School at Bourne End until it was placed in ‘special measures’ - someone who ought to have been highly placed to ensure the school maintained the high standards BCC claims it prides itself on was unable to prevent his school losing out in the musical chairs of ‘failing’ status and ‘special measures’ that secondary moderns are involved in. There are always failing secondary modern schools in special measures in this county and DfE performance statistics in this paper in the past suggest some schools not in special measures do less well than schools that are. Selective schools that do well out of selection are one half of the problem (for which reason they have been got rid of in other counties some of them Conservative-governe d ones) but here they are brought in to give a temporary fix to the schools who are hobbled by selection - thereby transforming themselves from part of the problem into part of a ‘solution’ to the problem. The idea that one artificially successful school helps a nearby failing school, always reminds me of the rich women in Victorian society who were the beneficiaries of massive inequalities of wealth in society and would engage in acts of ‘generosity’ by giving useful objects and small sums of money to the poor, old and disabled. The whole education system in this county is based on the idea that - far from ‘…enabling all pupils to flourish’ - some children are not really worth educating to a very high level, or exposing to the kind of educational influence that a man like Dr Holding can give, and that these children can be left unchallenged, and their potential unexplored and undeveloped. [italic]’He will use use [sic] his track record of success and professionalism as a school leader to provide leadership, support and advice to other schools in need of help.’ [/italic] [italic][bold]How[/bold] [/italic]will he fo about doing that? If Dr Holding’s experiences are in helping ‘Able Children’ and his aptitudes are in the fields of literature and film then what help is he going to give to the staff of schools that largely have the less able and less aspirational children concentrated in them, and that are not supposed to challenge or function in the same way as grammar schools? Bastions of selective excellence like SWBGS - genuinely beneficial though they are to their own pupils - are part of the problems with our educational system in this county, rather than a solution or a model to be aspired to. Undercover Euro Yob
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree