WWI school trophy turns up in a ditch down under

WWI school trophy turns up in a ditch down under

WWI school trophy turns up in a ditch down under

First published in News by

GARDENING turned into a treasure quest when a British-born woman found a relic from a Marlow school buried near her family's restaurant on the other side of the world.

From Adelaide in Australia, Julie Marshall discovered an inscription on a buried trophy which directed her towards Sir William Borlase’s Grammar School.

And returning the prize to its rightful home during a visit to the UK, Mrs Marshall recounted the story oif her incredible find to astonished students.

She said: "It was really good to come here, I think it was wonderful. I am so glad they seemed as thrilled as I was."

Mrs Marshall described how her husband "dug out a black object" while building a trench behind the restaurant in Aldinga, on the south coast of Australia.

She added: "I had a look on the internet, and wrote to the school, and they were delighted to hear about it. I've no idea how it ended up there in the ground."

The inscription reads: C. G. Bidwell - Junior Championships - Borlase School Sports - 1. 4. 18, and has been verified as a silver school trophy dating from the First World War.

Searching Borlasian historical archives, the school's Development Director Celia Blakeway-Philips discovered that brother of C. G. Bidwell, Arthur, has been named upon two cricket shields dated 1917 and 1918 in the school cloisters.

And during her visit, a presentation ceremony took place on Wednesday to officially return the trophy to the school.

Celia stated: "When I heard from Julie, it was such an exciting story and we hope to know more about how the trophy came to be buried in a field in Adelaide!"

Further research revealed that there were potentially two more Old Borlasian Bidwell brothers.

The silver trophy is five inches tall and endowed with the letters R P, a symbol of cross swords, an L and followed by EPNS sideways.

Mrs Marshall has attempted to research these elements in more depth, but has been unable to discover any more.

And along with the school, she has appealed to residents and Borlase alumni to contact the school if they have any further information.

Comments (3)

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11:53am Sun 8 Jun 14

geoffW says...

Chandos George Bidwell. Born 1906. Married Maud Laskey (Reading 1927)

Parents: Arthur (commercial traveller) and Sybil.

Brothers: Arthur Geoffrey (1902) and Phillip John (1903).

1911 Census, lived in Reading.

Was the head of the British Council in Poland in 1941. Took Polish citizenship in 1949.
Chandos George Bidwell. Born 1906. Married Maud Laskey (Reading 1927) Parents: Arthur (commercial traveller) and Sybil. Brothers: Arthur Geoffrey (1902) and Phillip John (1903). 1911 Census, lived in Reading. Was the head of the British Council in Poland in 1941. Took Polish citizenship in 1949. geoffW
  • Score: 3

1:26pm Sun 8 Jun 14

Welwyn Dowd says...

Not silver but electro-plated nickel silver = EPNS as in the mark. Cheap as chips.
Not silver but electro-plated nickel silver = EPNS as in the mark. Cheap as chips. Welwyn Dowd
  • Score: -6

2:52pm Sun 8 Jun 14

s6blr says...

There are some great people in the world who would find something like that, not bin it but work to get it back to where it came from.

Good on 'em !
There are some great people in the world who would find something like that, not bin it but work to get it back to where it came from. Good on 'em ! s6blr
  • Score: 9

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