Marlow flood levels near record high as fire service drafts in mega-pump

Bucks Free Press: The High Volume Pumping Equipmenr drafted in to help flood-hit areas The High Volume Pumping Equipmenr drafted in to help flood-hit areas

A HUGE pump capable of dealing with thousands of gallons of water has been drafted in to help the Marlow flood rescue efforts as river levels rise to near record levels.

Bucks Fire and Rescue confirmed a High Volume Pump (HVP) vehicle arrived in Marlow last night, delivered by Staffordshire Fire and Rescue teams.

The equipment arrived as the River Thames creeps dangerously close to the levels seen in 1947, when the Thames Valley was blighted by the worst floods of the 20th century.

As of this morning, water markers on the Thames banks are showing current flow only around a foot below the worst recorded floods over 60 years ago.

The fire service’s HVP is capable of pumping 7000 litres of water per minute, and is currently being used at Garnet Court where residents have been battling floods since the festive period.

Fraser Pearson, spokesman for Bucks Fire and Rescue, said: “It is making a huge difference, not just at Garnet Court but towards the whole operation in Marlow.

“It is a huge piece of equipment, and residents will certainly not be used to seeing fire engines like this one in the streets before.”

The HVP is capable of emptying an Olympic-size swimming pool in three hours - three times as fast as standard equipment.

Yesterday, Brandon Lewis, the government minister responsible for the fire service, said if firefighters require extra resources, they would be called in from other areas of the country.

Under the same mutual aid operation, Bucks Fire and Rescue sent a vehicle and team to Somerset to help battle the floods which are ravaging the south west.

However, there are currently no plans to recall the team from their Somerset operation.

Around 50 homes have been affected by floodwater, with residents evacuated from their homes over the weekend.

Flooding is affecting residents along Pound Lane, where the road is closed, and the cul-de-sacs in the vicinity.

The Gossmore area, Mill Lane and Firview Close have also been badly hit, with residents helped from their homes by Bucks Search and Rescue teams on Sunday.

The Environment Agency flood warning is still in place for Marlow, with other areas along the stretch of Thames from Berkshire to Surrey receiving severe warnings, or danger to life.

More rain is forecast for today and tomorrow, with Marlow MP Dominic Grieve set to visit the flood-hit areas later today.

Comments (7)

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1:01pm Tue 11 Feb 14

MunsterX says...

When these floods are over, anyone with a house anywhere near a river will be financiall ruined. The peak of the flooding in Thames Valley will occur during the last week of February with the water level ONE METRE above the red arrow in the second picture.

This new big pump may bring some comfort to residents in the short term, and indeed it may suck like the best of the idle Marlow Milfs on hubby's bonus week, but there's four feet at least to come on the water levels.
When these floods are over, anyone with a house anywhere near a river will be financiall ruined. The peak of the flooding in Thames Valley will occur during the last week of February with the water level ONE METRE above the red arrow in the second picture. This new big pump may bring some comfort to residents in the short term, and indeed it may suck like the best of the idle Marlow Milfs on hubby's bonus week, but there's four feet at least to come on the water levels. MunsterX

2:40pm Tue 11 Feb 14

Monty Cristo says...

Is this the same vehicle that I saw travelling down the M40 at high speed, under escort on Friday? If so, did it go somewhere else first? If not, why did it only arrive last night?
Is this the same vehicle that I saw travelling down the M40 at high speed, under escort on Friday? If so, did it go somewhere else first? If not, why did it only arrive last night? Monty Cristo

3:11pm Tue 11 Feb 14

gungun says...

MunsterX wrote:
When these floods are over, anyone with a house anywhere near a river will be financiall ruined. The peak of the flooding in Thames Valley will occur during the last week of February with the water level ONE METRE above the red arrow in the second picture. This new big pump may bring some comfort to residents in the short term, and indeed it may suck like the best of the idle Marlow Milfs on hubby's bonus week, but there's four feet at least to come on the water levels.
Ha Ha - This made me laugh particularly the MILF bit
[quote][p][bold]MunsterX[/bold] wrote: When these floods are over, anyone with a house anywhere near a river will be financiall ruined. The peak of the flooding in Thames Valley will occur during the last week of February with the water level ONE METRE above the red arrow in the second picture. This new big pump may bring some comfort to residents in the short term, and indeed it may suck like the best of the idle Marlow Milfs on hubby's bonus week, but there's four feet at least to come on the water levels.[/p][/quote]Ha Ha - This made me laugh particularly the MILF bit gungun

6:25pm Tue 11 Feb 14

DonRockell says...

The problem is that - Yes this is a high level flood but its not anywhere near a record and its not even as bad as some experienced during the early 70s. Just go and look at the Toilet by Temple Wear 1947 & 49 makes this flood look like a wet weekend.

The fact is that in 1962/3 a rather large housing estate was build in Marlow on what was Marsh land or flood plane and them they wonder why the petty so called flood relief schemes don't work. Simple they water rising not running off the hills and St Peter street can flood over its whole length at times. (why do you thing the Council Offices are high up on a built up bank.

PS in Grayling Close Marlow there is a house built using a JCB digger under its footings after it slid into a natural pond and couldn't be dragged out - The Pond is still there its just been covered over.
The problem is that - Yes this is a high level flood but its not anywhere near a record and its not even as bad as some experienced during the early 70s. Just go and look at the Toilet by Temple Wear 1947 & 49 makes this flood look like a wet weekend. The fact is that in 1962/3 a rather large housing estate was build in Marlow on what was Marsh land or flood plane and them they wonder why the petty so called flood relief schemes don't work. Simple they water rising not running off the hills and St Peter street can flood over its whole length at times. (why do you thing the Council Offices are high up on a built up bank. PS in Grayling Close Marlow there is a house built using a JCB digger under its footings after it slid into a natural pond and couldn't be dragged out - The Pond is still there its just been covered over. DonRockell

7:40pm Tue 11 Feb 14

CatherineAB says...

Where is the water being pumped to? Seems to me that it goes round and round in circles. The ground is waterlogged and can accept no more
Where is the water being pumped to? Seems to me that it goes round and round in circles. The ground is waterlogged and can accept no more CatherineAB

7:55pm Tue 11 Feb 14

wood81 says...

I have seen where the water it is being pumped to and it is right across the sports club and into the river which seems the right thing to do..
Until Pound Lane was built and the houses there were erected in the 1960s this area was always very swampy and has continued to flood in very wet weather. It is yet another example of building being allowed in an unsuitable place.
I have seen where the water it is being pumped to and it is right across the sports club and into the river which seems the right thing to do.. Until Pound Lane was built and the houses there were erected in the 1960s this area was always very swampy and has continued to flood in very wet weather. It is yet another example of building being allowed in an unsuitable place. wood81

11:14pm Tue 11 Feb 14

Undercover Euro Yob says...

DonRockell wrote:
The problem is that - Yes this is a high level flood but its not anywhere near a record and its not even as bad as some experienced during the early 70s. Just go and look at the Toilet by Temple Wear 1947 & 49 makes this flood look like a wet weekend.

The fact is that in 1962/3 a rather large housing estate was build in Marlow on what was Marsh land or flood plane and them they wonder why the petty so called flood relief schemes don't work. Simple they water rising not running off the hills and St Peter street can flood over its whole length at times. (why do you thing the Council Offices are high up on a built up bank.

PS in Grayling Close Marlow there is a house built using a JCB digger under its footings after it slid into a natural pond and couldn't be dragged out - The Pond is still there its just been covered over.
What does the last sentence mean?
[quote][p][bold]DonRockell[/bold] wrote: The problem is that - Yes this is a high level flood but its not anywhere near a record and its not even as bad as some experienced during the early 70s. Just go and look at the Toilet by Temple Wear 1947 & 49 makes this flood look like a wet weekend. The fact is that in 1962/3 a rather large housing estate was build in Marlow on what was Marsh land or flood plane and them they wonder why the petty so called flood relief schemes don't work. Simple they water rising not running off the hills and St Peter street can flood over its whole length at times. (why do you thing the Council Offices are high up on a built up bank. PS in Grayling Close Marlow there is a house built using a JCB digger under its footings after it slid into a natural pond and couldn't be dragged out - The Pond is still there its just been covered over.[/p][/quote]What does the last sentence mean? Undercover Euro Yob

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